Events

  • Tue
    16
    Jan
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (1/16 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Haoqi Zhang from Northwestern University will give a talk titled Computational Ecosystems: Tech-enabled Communities to Advance Human Values at Scale.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 1/15 if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/2zOmfkcvcuE4ZJv73

     

    Speaker Bio:

    Haoqi Zhang is the Allen K. and Johnnie Cordell Breed Junior Chair of Design and assistant professor in Computer Science at Northwestern University. His work advances the design of integrated socio-technical models that solve complex problems and advance human values at scale. His research bridges the fields of Human-Computer Interaction, Artificial Intelligence, Social & Crowd Computing, Learning Science, and Decision Science, and is generously supported by National Science Foundation grants in Cyber-Human Systems, Cyberlearning, and the Research Initiation Initiative.

    Haoqi received his PhD in Computer Science and BA in Computer Science and Economics from Harvard University. At Northwestern he founded and directs the Design, Technology, and Research (DTR) program, which provides an original model for research training for 50 graduate and undergraduate students. With Matt Easterday, Liz Gerber, and Nell O'Rourke, Haoqi co-directs the Delta Lab, an interdisciplinary research lab and design studio across computer science, learning science, and design.

     

    Abstract:

     

    Despite the continued development of individual technologies and processes for supporting human endeavors, major leaps in solving complex human problems will require advances in system-level thinking and orchestration. In this talk, I describe efforts to design, build, and study Computational Ecosystems that interweave community process, social structures, and intelligent systems to unite people and machines to solve complex problems and advance human values at scale. Computational ecosystems integrate various components to support ecosystem function; the interplay among components synergistically advances desired values and problem solving goals in ways that isolated technologies and processes cannot. Taking a systems approach to design, computational ecosystems emphasize (1) computational thinking to decompose and distribute problem solving to diverse people or machines most able to address them; and (2) ecological thinking to create sustainable processes and interactions that support jointly the goals of ecosystem members and proper ecosystem function.

    I present examples of computational ecosystems designed to advance community-based planning and research training, that respectively engages thousands of people in planning an event and empowers a single faculty member to provide authentic research training to 20+ students. These solutions demonstrate how to combine wedges of human and machine competencies into integrative technology-supported, community-based solutions. I will preview what's ahead for computational ecosystems, and close with a few thoughts on the role of computing technologies in advancing human values at scale.

    Please join us for this talk on 1/16 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    30
    Jan
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (1/23 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Michael Gurevich from University of Michigan will give a talk titled The Social Construction of New Digital Musical Instruments

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 1/21 if you will be there: https://goo.gl/forms/pi4hGyQdGimDWNIS2

    Abstract:

    This talk situates the practice of designing digital musical instruments with respect to models of musical-social interaction. I argue that the conventional composer-performer-listener model, and the underlying metaphor of music-as-communication upon which it relies, cannot reflect the richness of interaction and possibility afforded by digital technologies. Building on Paul Lansky’s vision of an expanded and dynamic social network, I present an alternative, ecological view of music-making, in which the opportunities for creation, design, and the production of meaning emerge from the inherent uncertainty in the interfaces that mediate musical-social interactions. However, the increased potential afforded by digital systems is undermined by our tendency to treat digital musical instrument design as a form of invention, wherein the various roles in this network are collapsed into a single individual. Using examples from my own practice, I describe approaches to designing instruments that respond to the technologies that form the interfaces of the network, which can include scores and stylistic conventions.

    Speaker Bio:

    Michael Gurevich is Associate Professor and Chair of Performing Arts Technology at the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance, where he teaches courses in physical computing, electronic music performance, and interdisciplinary collaboration. His research employs quantitative, qualitative, humanistic, and practice-based methods to explore the aesthetic and interactional possibilities that can emerge in music performance with computer systems. Prior to the University of Michigan, Professor Gurevich was a Lecturer at the Sonic Arts Research Centre (SARC) at Queen’s University Belfast, and a research scientist at the Institute for Infocomm Research in Singapore. He holds a B.M. from McGill University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford. He is an active author and editor in the New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME), computer music, and human-computer interaction communities, was Music Chair for the 2012 NIME conference in Ann Arbor, and is a Vice-President of the International Computer Music Association.

    Please join us for this talk on 1/23 @ 11:30 AM

    Best,

    Your #flawless MISC 2017-18 Team

    Matthew Kay, Sang Won Lee, Joyojeet Pal, Penny Trieu

    (I’m running out of public-friendly adjectives beginning with “f.” If you read all this way, please send help.)

    On Tuesday (1/16 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Haoqi Zhang from Northwestern University will give a talk titled Computational Ecosystems: Tech-enabled Communities to Advance Human Values at Scale.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 1/15 if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/2zOmfkcvcuE4ZJv73

     

  • Tue
    06
    Feb
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (2/06 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Omar Sosa-Tzec from University of Michigan will give a talk titled Can we use rhetoric to talk about delight in interactive systems?

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/0UDvSV0alATvYMQq1

    Abstract:
    Delight has become a matter of interest for interaction designers. Those moments of surprise and pleasure during the user experience can affect the user's perception regarding the system's performance, character, and significance in her everyday life. In this sense, the delight inherent to a system's design entails a persuasive intent. Since rhetoric is concerned with persuasion and emotion, it is reasonable to ask if this discipline can help us study the relationship between delight and a system's design features. In this talk, I will discuss how I have utilized rhetorical concepts to analyze the design of interfaces and have drawn connections between the results of these analyses and existing constructs of delight and pleasure from diverse perspectives. The goal of this talk to illustrate one way to bring rhetoric into human-computer interaction/interaction design and articulate the notion of delight in interactive systems.

    Speaker Bio:

    Omar Sosa Tzec is an information and interface designer fascinated by the creation of visually-oriented interactive-informational artifacts, how they create meaning, and how they impact everyday life. His research lies at the intersection of information design, human-computer interaction, rhetoric, semiotics, and multimodal argumentation. Within that space, Tzec explores the application of theory for the analysis of such artifacts and the articulation of their compositional and experiential qualities. He is also interested in diagrammatic thinking and representations applied to knowledge transfer and design processes, sketching in UX design, symbols in graphical user interfaces, typography, and lettering. Tzec has a PhD in Informatics (track: Human-Computer Interaction Design) from Indiana University Bloomington (USA), MA in Information Design from University of the Americas Puebla (Mexico) and MS in Computer Science from Center for Research in Mathematics (Mexico).

    Please join us for this talk on 2/6 @ 11:30 AM

     

  • Tue
    13
    Feb
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (2/13 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Sile O'Modhrain from University of Michigan will give a talk titled The Holy Braille: A Case Study for the role of Perceptual Studies in the design Process.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP if you will be there: https://goo.gl/forms/3ZrOraEQL37Tsyew1

    Abstract:

    For the past five years, I have been working with colleagues in Mechanical Engineering to design and build a full-page tactile display. You could think of this as a braille kindle.  We have developed a new method of packing dots and the circuitry to make them move using microfluidic techniques. In parallel, we have been asking some fundamental questions about how people read braille, questions that have influenced how we design and build the device.

    In this talk, I will present two studies.  In the first, we asked whether there is a real advantage in building a whole page of dots since the reader's fingers only ever come into contact with a small number of dots at a time.  In the second study, we asked whether a tactile array with a dot density high enough to support the display of tactile graphics (with curved lines, etc) would still be able to present readable braille.  In this talk, I will introduce the motivation for the "Holy Braille" project and present the results of these studies.

    Speaker Bio:

    Sile O'Modhrain is a professor in Performing Arts Technology at the school of Music, Theatre and Dance at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on human-computer interaction, especially interfaces incorporating haptic and auditory feedback. She earned her master's degree in music technology from the University of York and her PhD from Stanford University's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). She has also worked as a sound engineer and producer for BBC Network Radio. In 1994, she received a Fulbright scholarship, and went to Stanford to develop a prototype haptic interface augmenting graphical user interfaces for blind computer users. Before taking up her position at the University of Michigan, Sile taught at the Sonic Arts Research Centre at Queens University Belfast and, from 2001-2005 directed the Palpable Machines group at Media Lab Europe.

    Please join us for this talk on 2/13 @ 11:30 AM