Events

  • Tue
    16
    Jan
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (1/16 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Haoqi Zhang from Northwestern University will give a talk titled Computational Ecosystems: Tech-enabled Communities to Advance Human Values at Scale.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 1/15 if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/2zOmfkcvcuE4ZJv73

     

    Speaker Bio:

    Haoqi Zhang is the Allen K. and Johnnie Cordell Breed Junior Chair of Design and assistant professor in Computer Science at Northwestern University. His work advances the design of integrated socio-technical models that solve complex problems and advance human values at scale. His research bridges the fields of Human-Computer Interaction, Artificial Intelligence, Social & Crowd Computing, Learning Science, and Decision Science, and is generously supported by National Science Foundation grants in Cyber-Human Systems, Cyberlearning, and the Research Initiation Initiative.

    Haoqi received his PhD in Computer Science and BA in Computer Science and Economics from Harvard University. At Northwestern he founded and directs the Design, Technology, and Research (DTR) program, which provides an original model for research training for 50 graduate and undergraduate students. With Matt Easterday, Liz Gerber, and Nell O'Rourke, Haoqi co-directs the Delta Lab, an interdisciplinary research lab and design studio across computer science, learning science, and design.

     

    Abstract:

     

    Despite the continued development of individual technologies and processes for supporting human endeavors, major leaps in solving complex human problems will require advances in system-level thinking and orchestration. In this talk, I describe efforts to design, build, and study Computational Ecosystems that interweave community process, social structures, and intelligent systems to unite people and machines to solve complex problems and advance human values at scale. Computational ecosystems integrate various components to support ecosystem function; the interplay among components synergistically advances desired values and problem solving goals in ways that isolated technologies and processes cannot. Taking a systems approach to design, computational ecosystems emphasize (1) computational thinking to decompose and distribute problem solving to diverse people or machines most able to address them; and (2) ecological thinking to create sustainable processes and interactions that support jointly the goals of ecosystem members and proper ecosystem function.

    I present examples of computational ecosystems designed to advance community-based planning and research training, that respectively engages thousands of people in planning an event and empowers a single faculty member to provide authentic research training to 20+ students. These solutions demonstrate how to combine wedges of human and machine competencies into integrative technology-supported, community-based solutions. I will preview what's ahead for computational ecosystems, and close with a few thoughts on the role of computing technologies in advancing human values at scale.

    Please join us for this talk on 1/16 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    30
    Jan
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (1/23 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Michael Gurevich from University of Michigan will give a talk titled The Social Construction of New Digital Musical Instruments

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 1/21 if you will be there: https://goo.gl/forms/pi4hGyQdGimDWNIS2

    Abstract:

    This talk situates the practice of designing digital musical instruments with respect to models of musical-social interaction. I argue that the conventional composer-performer-listener model, and the underlying metaphor of music-as-communication upon which it relies, cannot reflect the richness of interaction and possibility afforded by digital technologies. Building on Paul Lansky’s vision of an expanded and dynamic social network, I present an alternative, ecological view of music-making, in which the opportunities for creation, design, and the production of meaning emerge from the inherent uncertainty in the interfaces that mediate musical-social interactions. However, the increased potential afforded by digital systems is undermined by our tendency to treat digital musical instrument design as a form of invention, wherein the various roles in this network are collapsed into a single individual. Using examples from my own practice, I describe approaches to designing instruments that respond to the technologies that form the interfaces of the network, which can include scores and stylistic conventions.

    Speaker Bio:

    Michael Gurevich is Associate Professor and Chair of Performing Arts Technology at the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance, where he teaches courses in physical computing, electronic music performance, and interdisciplinary collaboration. His research employs quantitative, qualitative, humanistic, and practice-based methods to explore the aesthetic and interactional possibilities that can emerge in music performance with computer systems. Prior to the University of Michigan, Professor Gurevich was a Lecturer at the Sonic Arts Research Centre (SARC) at Queen’s University Belfast, and a research scientist at the Institute for Infocomm Research in Singapore. He holds a B.M. from McGill University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford. He is an active author and editor in the New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME), computer music, and human-computer interaction communities, was Music Chair for the 2012 NIME conference in Ann Arbor, and is a Vice-President of the International Computer Music Association.

    Please join us for this talk on 1/23 @ 11:30 AM

    Best,

    Your #flawless MISC 2017-18 Team

    Matthew Kay, Sang Won Lee, Joyojeet Pal, Penny Trieu

    (I’m running out of public-friendly adjectives beginning with “f.” If you read all this way, please send help.)

    On Tuesday (1/16 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Haoqi Zhang from Northwestern University will give a talk titled Computational Ecosystems: Tech-enabled Communities to Advance Human Values at Scale.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 1/15 if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/2zOmfkcvcuE4ZJv73

     

  • Tue
    06
    Feb
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (2/06 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Omar Sosa-Tzec from University of Michigan will give a talk titled Can we use rhetoric to talk about delight in interactive systems?

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/0UDvSV0alATvYMQq1

    Abstract:
    Delight has become a matter of interest for interaction designers. Those moments of surprise and pleasure during the user experience can affect the user's perception regarding the system's performance, character, and significance in her everyday life. In this sense, the delight inherent to a system's design entails a persuasive intent. Since rhetoric is concerned with persuasion and emotion, it is reasonable to ask if this discipline can help us study the relationship between delight and a system's design features. In this talk, I will discuss how I have utilized rhetorical concepts to analyze the design of interfaces and have drawn connections between the results of these analyses and existing constructs of delight and pleasure from diverse perspectives. The goal of this talk to illustrate one way to bring rhetoric into human-computer interaction/interaction design and articulate the notion of delight in interactive systems.

    Speaker Bio:

    Omar Sosa Tzec is an information and interface designer fascinated by the creation of visually-oriented interactive-informational artifacts, how they create meaning, and how they impact everyday life. His research lies at the intersection of information design, human-computer interaction, rhetoric, semiotics, and multimodal argumentation. Within that space, Tzec explores the application of theory for the analysis of such artifacts and the articulation of their compositional and experiential qualities. He is also interested in diagrammatic thinking and representations applied to knowledge transfer and design processes, sketching in UX design, symbols in graphical user interfaces, typography, and lettering. Tzec has a PhD in Informatics (track: Human-Computer Interaction Design) from Indiana University Bloomington (USA), MA in Information Design from University of the Americas Puebla (Mexico) and MS in Computer Science from Center for Research in Mathematics (Mexico).

    Please join us for this talk on 2/6 @ 11:30 AM

     

  • Tue
    13
    Feb
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (2/13 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Sile O'Modhrain from University of Michigan will give a talk titled The Holy Braille: A Case Study for the role of Perceptual Studies in the Design Process.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP if you will be there: https://goo.gl/forms/3ZrOraEQL37Tsyew1

    Abstract:

    For the past five years, I have been working with colleagues in Mechanical Engineering to design and build a full-page tactile display. You could think of this as a braille kindle.  We have developed a new method of packing dots and the circuitry to make them move using microfluidic techniques. In parallel, we have been asking some fundamental questions about how people read braille, questions that have influenced how we design and build the device.

    In this talk, I will present two studies.  In the first, we asked whether there is a real advantage in building a whole page of dots since the reader's fingers only ever come into contact with a small number of dots at a time.  In the second study, we asked whether a tactile array with a dot density high enough to support the display of tactile graphics (with curved lines, etc) would still be able to present readable braille.  In this talk, I will introduce the motivation for the "Holy Braille" project and present the results of these studies.

    Speaker Bio:

    Sile O'Modhrain is a professor in Performing Arts Technology at the school of Music, Theatre and Dance at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on human-computer interaction, especially interfaces incorporating haptic and auditory feedback. She earned her master's degree in music technology from the University of York and her PhD from Stanford University's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). She has also worked as a sound engineer and producer for BBC Network Radio. In 1994, she received a Fulbright scholarship, and went to Stanford to develop a prototype haptic interface augmenting graphical user interfaces for blind computer users. Before taking up her position at the University of Michigan, Sile taught at the Sonic Arts Research Centre at Queens University Belfast and, from 2001-2005 directed the Palpable Machines group at Media Lab Europe.

    Please join us for this talk on 2/13 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    06
    Mar
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    After a two-week MISC hiatus, on Tuesday (03/06 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Gierad Laput from Carnegie Mellon University will give a talk titled Unleashing Ubiquitous, Unobtrusive and Practical Contextual Sensing.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/xOCqSAD3faM0tVD43

    Abstract:
    As computing becomes increasingly embedded into the fabric of everyday life, systems that understand people’s context of use are of paramount importance. Regardless of whether the platform is a mobile device, wearable, or smart infrastructure, context offers an implicit dimension that is vital in reducing interactive viscosity and increasing the richness of human-computer interactions. In this talk, I introduce two visions for greatly enhancing context awareness without costly or invasive instrumentation: 1) using wearables to transform the human arm into an input and sensing platform, and 2) transforming spaces into smart environments with general-purpose “synthetic” sensors. By combining novel sensing with machine learning, my work transforms raw signals into intelligent abstractions that can power rich, context-sensitive applications, unleashing the potential of next-generation computing platforms.

    Bio:
    Gierad is a Ph.D. candidate at Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science, specializing in Human-Computer Interaction. His research explores the intersection of sensing and machine learning, enabling fluid, unobtrusive, and more human-centric applications. Gierad received his B.S. EE and M.S.I. at the University of Michigan. His work has garnered multiple Best Paper awards, and he’s been invited to the program committees for ACM CHI 2018, UIST 2018, and CHI 2019. He is a Qualcomm, Adobe, Yahoo! and Disney Research Fellow, and is a recipient of the prestigious Fast Company Innovation by Design Award. Gierad is also Editor-in-Chief of XRDS, ACM’s premiere magazine for students.

    Homepage: www.gierad.com

    Please join us for this talk on 3/6 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    13
    Mar
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    We are excited to announce that, on Tuesday (3/13 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), our very own Sang Won Lee (MISC Graduate Student Coordinator) will give a talk titled Improving user involvement through live collaborative creation.

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/sW5fH8107y4xVkXk2

    Abstract

    Creating an artifact, such as writing a book, developing software, or performing a piece of music, is often limited to those with domain-specific experience or training. As a consequence, effectively involving non-expert end users in such creative processes is challenging. My research focuses on creating interactive systems that support live creation and collaboration, in which the process of creating an artifact is visible in real time to end users and invites them to collaborate with others. These systems help preserve our natural expressivity, support real-time communication, and facilitate participation in the creative process. Through these interactive systems, non-expert participants can collaborate to create such artifacts as GUI prototypes, software, and musical performances. For example, one of the systems that I developed enables large-scale audience participation at a public concert, where audience members collaboratively perform a piece of music using their smartphones. My thesis work has explored three topics linked to live creation and collaboration: (1) the challenges inherent to collaborative creation in live settings, and computational tools that address them; (2) methods for reducing the barrier of entry to live collaboration; and (3) approaches to preserve liveness in the creative process, affording creators more expressivity in making artifacts. Enabling collaborative, expressive, and live interactions in computational systems will invite the broader population to take part in creative practices.

    Bio

    Sang Won Lee is a Ph.D. candidate in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. His work lies at the intersection of human-computer interaction and computer music. His research aims to bring the collaborative, live nature of music making to computational systems by developing interactive systems that facilitate real-time collaboration on creative tasks. His work explores how to computationally mediate musical collaboration and enable novel musical expression. More broadly, he has applied his findings from interactive music to applications in a variety of fields, including crowdsourcing, design, writing, and programming. These systems help people collaboratively create artifacts and experience liveness while collaborating with other people. He holds a diploma in Industrial Engineering from Seoul National University and an M.S. in Music Technology from Georgia Tech. He has been an active author in top-tier computer music conferences, such as New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME), as well as broader human-computer interaction venues, like ACM UIST and ACM CHI. In addition to academic research publications, he has presented his research in the form of musical performances at peer-reviewed venues, including NIME, Art-CHI, and ICMC He is a winner of the International Computer Music Association–Music Award 2016 for his composition Live Writing: Gloomy Streets.

    Please join us for this talk on

    ​​

    3/13 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    20
    Mar
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

      

    We are very honored to announce another excellent talk happening next week. During our usual Tuesday time, March 20th, 11:30 AM - 1 PM, Alex Leavitt will give a talk titled From Research to Product: Designing Tools for Information Integrity.

     

    RSVP for Alex Leavitt’s talk (light lunch will be provided): https://goo.gl/forms/df1P46RzzJqribQK2

     

    Abstract:

    As platforms try to address critical information problems, it is vitally important to understand the everyday issues that people have. Alex Leavitt, at Facebook Research, will explain how user research plays a pivotal role in social media product development, helping designers and engineers ground platform design in people’s problems and experiences around the world. The talk will cover how user research intersects with and influences strategy in the product development cycle, exploring one case study of a recent project – Article Context – that addresses peoples’ concerns around information credibility directly within the Facebook app.

    Bio:

    Alex Leavitt is a computational social scientist at Facebook Research. At Facebook, Alex conducts research for the News Feed product team, where he studies the impact of social ties and algorithms on people’s exposure to and engagement with news, politics, and misinformation. He uses a range of mixed methods from survey experiments, machine learning, and social network analysis to traditional ethnographic interviews and observation. Alex received his PhD from the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism at the University of Southern California, where he studied collaborative news aggregation practices in large online communities. His research is published at venues such as the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, the ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, and Social Media + Society. Previously, Alex was a researcher at Sony PlayStation, Disney Interactive, Microsoft Research New England, and MIT.

     

  • Fri
    23
    Mar
    2018
    2:00 pmErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

      

    We are very excited to announce two back-to-back talks by Jessica Vitak & D. Yvette Wohn, co-sponsored by MISC and the Social Media Research Lab (SMRL)! On Friday, from 2 - 3 PM, Jessica Vitak and D. Yvette Wohn will each give a 20-minute talk, with 20 minutes for Q&A at the end.

     

    RSVP here for the talks: https://goo.gl/forms/qzJZRHJjxVz4sjSc2

    Jessica Vitak:

    Title: Where's my data going? Privacy, security, and ethical challenges in the era of ubiquitous data collection

    Abstract: Over the past decade, the Internet of Things has pushed its way into our workplaces and homes by making regular products "smarter." We now wear watches to track our steps, heart rate, and sleep patterns. Our thermostats learn over time about our heating and cooling preferences. Our refrigerator can detect when we run out of milk. And our intelligent personal assistants passively listen for a voice cue ("Alexa!") to respond to our questions and commands. In many ways, we are living in the science fiction future we dreamed of decades ago. On the other hand, the influx of devices meant to collect constant data about your movement and location, health, and purchasing patterns raise significant questions about the privacy and security of that data. In this talk, I'll share early results from two NSF grants, one looking at privacy and surveillance on smartphones and intelligent personal assistants like Siri and Alexa, and the other collaborative project on pervasive data ethics. I'll also raise questions for researchers working in this space to consider as they work with large, public datasets to ensure they are taking adequate steps to protect the data and the users behind that data.

    Bio: Jessica Vitak (PhD, Michigan State University) is an assistant professor in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland and associate director of the Human Computer Interaction Lab (HCIL). Her research evaluates the benefits and drawbacks of mediated communication technologies by focusing on the role that social and technical affordances shape interactions online. Specifically, she focuses on questions around data privacy and security, as well as pervasive data ethics, around the generation, collection, and analysis of large-scale user data. She is currently PI or Co-PI on three federal grants on these topics (NSF-SES-1640640, NSF-IIS-1704369, and IMLS-LG-81-16-0154-16). For more information, see https://pearl.umd.edu.

    D. Yvette Wohn:

    Title: The Bot Stops Here: Understanding Social Support Provision in Social Media

    Abstract: A main characteristic of current social systems is that they are designed to captivate the attention of users but are rarely designed to give support to those that need it. How much are current systems designed for optimal emotional, instrumental, and financial support provision? In this talk, I will discuss two projects that investigate how sociotechnical factors can facilitate social support and counter online harassment. In both projects, algorithms played a prominent role, but were never enough on their own—the most effective bots were those that made a human touch scalable.

    Bio: D. Yvette Wohn (Ph.D., Michigan State University) is an assistant professor of informatics at New Jersey Institute of Technology and director of the Social Interaction Lab (socialinteractionlab.com), which is funded by the National Science Foundation, Mozilla Foundation, and Yahoo among others. Her research focuses on understanding and designing social systems for well-being, as well as the darker side of technology usage such as addiction and online harassment.

  • Tue
    27
    Mar
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

      

    We are excited to announce that, on Tuesday (03/27 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Eric Gilbert from University of Michigan will give a talk titled Blocklists and bans: two recent studies on online community moderation.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided.

    Please RSVP if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/bNvCE3N2CAJM6wEb2


    Abstract:

    Since its earliest days, harassment and abuse have plagued the internet. In this talk, I will discuss two recent results from my lab around online community moderation, or the practices and algorithms employed by social platforms to limit abusive behavior. First, I will discuss a mixed methods study using Twitter blocklists to interrogate online harassment--the forms it takes, as well as tactics used by harassers. (A *blocklist* is a list of users that are preemptively blocked from interacting with a blocklist subscriber.) Second, I will report on our use of computational methods to assess the efficacy of Reddit's ban of two hate groups in 2015. I'll conclude the talk by briefly sketching ongoing work in my lab around moderation practices and tools.

    Bio:

    Eric Gilbert is the John Derby Evans Associate Professor in the School of Information at the University of Michigan. Before coming to Michigan, he led the comp.social lab at Georgia Tech. Dr. Gilbert is a sociotechnologist, with a research focus on building and studying social media systems. His work has been supported by grants from a variety of companies, as well as the NSF, ARL, and DARPA. Dr. Gilbert's work has earned multiple best paper awards, and been covered by outlets including Wired, NPR and The New York Times. He is the recipient of an NSF CAREER award and the Sigma Xi Young Faculty Award. Professor Gilbert holds a BS in Math & CS and a PhD in CS—-both from from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

    Please join us for this talk on 3/27 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    03
    Apr
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    We are very excited to announce two back-to-back practice talks for CHI & ICWSM by Megh Marathe & Lindsay Blackwell from the University of Michigan! On Tuesday, April 3rd, Megh, and Lindsay will each give a 15 - 20-minute talk, with 20 minutes for Q&A at the end. RSVP here for the talks: https://goo.gl/forms/DrsmdkbDGpUG3LiE2

    Lindsay Blackwell


    Title: When Online Harassment is Perceived as Justified (ICWSM 2018)

    Abstract:

    Most models of criminal justice seek to identify and punish offenders. However, these models break down in online environments, where offenders can hide behind anonymity and lagging legal systems. As a result, people turn to their own moral codes to sanction perceived offenses. Unfortunately, this vigilante justice is motivated by retribution, often resulting in personal attacks, public shaming, and doxing—behaviors known as online harassment. We conducted two online experiments (n=160; n=432) to test the relationship between retribution and the perception of online harassment as appropriate, justified, and deserved. Study 1 tested attitudes about online harassment when directed toward a woman who has stolen from an elderly couple. Study 2 tested the effects of social conformity and bystander intervention. We find that people believe online harassment is more deserved and more justified—but not more appropriate—when the target has committed some offense. Promisingly, we find that bystander intervention can reduce this perception. We discuss alternative approaches and designs for responding to harassment online.

    Bio:

    Lindsay Blackwell is a PhD candidate in the University of Michigan School of Information's Social Media Research Lab and a UX Researcher with PRO Unlimited at Facebook. Lindsay uses mixed social science methods (e.g., semi-structured interviews, surveys, and experiments) to investigate abusive behaviors in online communities, including online harassment and hate speech. Her research has been published in CHI, CSCW, ICWSM, and Social Media + Society. Prior to starting graduate school, Lindsay worked as a social media director, directing marketing strategies and creating campaigns for national clients including I Love New York.

     

    Megh Marathe:

     

    Title: Semi-Automated Coding for Qualitative Research: A User-Centered Inquiry and Initial Prototypes (Best Paper Award at CHI 2018 - top 1%)

    Abstract:

    Qualitative researchers perform an important and painstaking data annotation process known as coding. However, much of the process can be tedious and repetitive, becoming prohibitive for large datasets. Could coding be partially automated, and should it be? To answer this question, we interviewed researchers and observed them code interview transcripts. We found that across disciplines, researchers follow several coding practices well-suited to automation. Further, researchers desire automation after having developed a codebook and coded a subset of data, particularly in extending their coding to unseen data. Researchers also require any assistive tool to be transparent about its recommendations. Based on our findings, we built prototypes to partially automate coding using simple natural language processing techniques. Our top-performing system generates coding that matches human coders on inter-rater reliability measures. We discuss implications for interface and algorithm design, meta-issues around automating qualitative research, and suggestions for future work.

    Bio:

    Megh is a queer, feminist, nonbinary, and disabled PhD student at the University of Michigan School of Information. Drawing upon scholarship in disability studies, science and technology studies, and sociology of illness experience, Megh seeks to understand the temporal experience of seizures for people with epilepsy; particularly in relation to the imaginaries of time deployed in the design of diagnostic and health-tracking devices. His work on natural language processing and bureaucratic grievance redress has appeared in CHI, CICLing, ICTD, and DEV, receiving one best paper award. Megh holds an MS in Computer Science from the University of Toronto.

     

    Please join us for these talks on April 3rd @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    10
    Apr
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (4/10 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Ken Goldberg from UC Berkeley will give a talk titled Next Generation Brainstorming.

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. RSVP here :

    https://goo.gl/forms/sBCYrzQRodSQlmoG3

    Speaker Bio:

    Ken Goldberg is an artist, inventor, and UC Berkeley Professor focusing on robotics. He was appointed the William S. Floyd Jr Distinguished Chair in Engineering and serves as Chair of the Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Department. He has secondary appointments in EECS, Art Practice, the School of Information, and Radiation Oncology at the UCSF Medical School. Ken is Director of the CITRIS "People and Robots" Initiative and the UC Berkeley AUTOLAB where he and his students pursue research in machine learning for robotics and automation in warehouses, homes, and operating rooms. Ken developed the first provably complete algorithms for part feeding and part fixturing and the first robot on the Internet. Despite agonizingly slow progress, he persists in trying to make robots less clumsy. He has over 250 peer-reviewed publications and 8 U.S. Patents. He co-founded and served as Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering. Ken's artwork has appeared in 70 exhibits including the Whitney Biennial and films he has co-written have been selected for Sundance and nominated for an Emmy Award. Ken was awarded the NSF PECASE (Presidential Faculty Fellowship) from President Bill Clinton in 1995, elected IEEE Fellow in 2005 and selected by the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society for the George Saridis Leadership Award in 2016. He lives in the Bay Area and is madly in love with his wife, filmmaker and Webby Awards founder Tiffany Shlain, and their two daughters. (goldberg.berkeley.edu @Ken_Goldberg)

    Abstract:
    The process of brainstorming hasn't changed much since the term was coined in 1953. Yet everything else has: we're facing enormous problems in economics, politics, healthcare, and the environment. We have big data. We have big problems. How can we leverage technology to find solutions?

    To brainstorm at the scale of social media, we're using techniques from an unlikely source: Robotics. To achieve scale and speed, our Collaborative Discovery Engine employs non-linear spatial models that present a broad diversity of ideas and higher-order statistical filtering that rapidly extract the most valuable ideas (the signals) from the noise.I'll present recent results on social innovation and collective brainstorming work with the U.S. State Department, General Motors, and the State of California.

     

  • Tue
    17
    Apr
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    RSVP here for the talks: https://goo.gl/forms/Whc49DafRDu0do742

    Tamy Guberek


    Title: Keeping a Low Profile?: Technology, Risk and Privacy among Undocumented Immigrants. (Best Paper Award at CHI 2018 - top 1%)

    Abstract:

    Undocumented immigrants in the United States face risks of discrimination, surveillance, and deportation. We investigate their technology use, risk perceptions, and protective strategies relating to their vulnerability. Through semi-structured interviews with Latinx undocumented immigrants, we find that while participants act to address offline threats, this vigilance does not translate to their online activities. Their technology use is shaped by needs and benefits rather than risk perceptions. While our participants are concerned about identity theft and privacy generally, and some raise concerns about online harassment, their understanding of online government surveillance risks is vague and met with resignation. We identify tensions among self-expression, group privacy, and self-censorship related to their immigration status, as well as strong trust in service providers. Our findings have implications for digital literacy education, privacy and security interfaces, and technology design in general. Even minor design decisions can substantially affect exposure risks and well-being for such vulnerable communities.

    Bio:

    Tamy is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Michigan School of Information. Tamy’s research focuses on various challenges as data, archives and technology intersect with advancing human rights and protecting vulnerable communities in the U.S. and abroad. She has published in Archival Science, Statistics Politics and Policy, JSM, and CHI, as well as co-authored various reports with and for human rights practitioners. Prior to graduate school, Tamy was the Latin America Coordinator for the Human Rights Data Analysis Group.

    Vaishnav Kameswaran:

    Title: Support for Social and Cultural Capital Development in Real-time Ridesharing Services

    Abstract:

    Today’s transportation systems and technologies have the potential to transform the ways individuals acquire resources from their social networks and environments. However, it is unclear what types of resources can be acquired and how technology could support these efforts. We address this gap by investigating these questions in the domain of real-time ridesharing systems. We present insights from two qualitative studies: (1) a set of semi-structured interviews with 13 Uber drivers and (2) a set of semi-structured interviews with 13 Uber riders. Our results show that both drivers and riders acquired and benefited from informational, emotional and instrumental resources, as well as cultural exchanges via interactions with each other and with online platforms. We argue that these interactions could support the development of social and cultural capital. We discuss our findings in the context of labor and contribute design implications for in-car social and cultural experiences and for the ways technologies such as GPS and location-based services can support the additional emotional, social, and cultural labor that drivers provide to their riders.

    Bio:

    Vaishnav is a first-year Ph.D. student at the University of Michigan - School of Information. His research interests lie at the intersection of Human-Computer Interaction and Accessibility. His current research examines the value of mainstream, non-assistive technology infrastructures for people with Vision Impairments and the subsequent role of design in bridging the gap between inaccessibility and accessibility. His past work examining aspects of the digital divide in Detroit and tech adoption in the Global South has appeared in CHI and ICTD. Vaishnav holds a Masters degree in Human-Computer Interaction from UMSI.

    Please join us for these talks on April 17th @ 11:30 AM

     

  • Tue
    11
    Sep
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    MISC will kick off the year with a series of lightning talks from our new faculty at UMSI. Barbara Ericson,Cecilia H Fernandez, Julie Hui, Gabi Marcu, A.J. Million, and Alanson Sample will be giving brief introductions of their research.

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 9/9 if you will be there.

  • Tue
    18
    Sep
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    MISC will have a double kickoff this year with a second series of lightning talks from new faculty. Marouane Kessentini, Oliver Haimson, Mark Guzidal, Tiago Cunha, Deepa Butoliya, and Nazanin Andalibi will be giving brief introductions of their research.

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 9/16 if you will be there.

  • Mon
    24
    Sep
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    Eytan Adar is an Associate Professor in the School of Information & Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. He works broadly at the intersection of HCI and IR/Data Mining and ranges from empirical studies of large-scale online behaviors to building new systems, tools and methods. He completed his doctoral work in the Computer Science at the University of Washington and has Masters and Bachelors degrees from MIT. Before going back for his Ph.D., Eytan was a researcher at HP Labs and Xerox PARC for a number of years (spinning out a company called Outride somewhere in there). Eytan is co-founder of ICWSM and has served as general chair for ICWSM and WSDM. His website is at http://www.cond.org

    Overview:

    Despite significant progress, there is a persistent mismatch between the characteristics of AI-driven features and end-user expectations. In simpler times we could joke that UI's were writing a check the AI couldn't cash. AI-based sub-systems deliver wonderful services but also failure and uncertainty. The result is that intelligent systems couldn't quite behave in the way UI designers wanted—or promised—they would. In this talk, I'll illustrate how the problem has also flipped: AI designers are now overpromising things interfaces can't deliver. Decision-theoretic constructs such as `mixed-initiative' provide broad strategies—but not tactics—for addressing this problem. While we have evolved a set of examples for masking, controlling, and explaining, as ways to manage the AI-UI bridge, a more generic design language (patterns & UI style) is elusive. As more AI-driven features become integrated into user-facing systems, the development of a modern design language is critical. I'll try to lay out the value (and challenges) of such a language. If done correctly, both end-users navigating the uncertainty/noise of AI-features and data-hungry AI subsystems will benefit.
  • Tue
    02
    Oct
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    RSVP here.

    Abstract

    Arguably, HCI and CSCW are characterized by their egalitarian philosophy on methods. Lately, we have seen an increasing number of scholars drawing from the humanities (e.g., literary theory, philosophy) in their studies. In this talk, I discuss my ongoing efforts in human centered computing to conduct fieldwork and design at the intersection of social science (e.g., ethnography, computational social science) and humanistic approaches. Building on past work, I will lay out several key challenges that make the "blending" of the two ostensibly intractable. Yet, having the methods speak to each other by adopting the other's epistemological baggage may open the door to effective methods that significantly move the field forward. We can also draw on the fact that many of us engage with, to some degree, the humanities. Illustrating with examples from my research on various subcultures, I hope to inspire others to develop their own approaches incorporating the humanities with social sciences in HCI.

     

    Bio
    Norman Makoto Su is an Assistant Professor in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering at Indiana University Bloomington. His research interests lie in human–computer interaction (HCI) and computer–supported cooperative work (CSCW). His Authentic User Experience (AUX) lab characterizes the relationship of technology with subcultures and designs systems to account for their authentic practices and values. He received his Ph.D. in Information and Computer Science from the University of California, Irvine and a B.A. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley, with a minor in Music. He was a postdoctoral research fellow in the School of Information and Library Studies at University College Dublin, Ireland. He has done internships at IBM, The Aerospace Corporation, and PARC.

  • Tue
    09
    Oct
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    Title: Making a Pecan Pie: Understanding and Supporting the Holistic Review Process in Admissions

    RSVP here for a light lunch beforehand.

    Abstract

    Holistic reviews are a common practice employed by universities in the United States to make admissions decisions.  It is an individualized review process where reviewers assess an applicant’s potential by considering various criteria including academic metrics, adversities faced, and personal attributes. While the factors considered in such reviews are broadly known, a detailed walk-through of the process is absent in existing literature. This is important to understand what is done in practice and to identify opportunities for technological interventions to support the complex and changing decision-making process.   In this talk, I will present an in-depth characterization of the process at a highly-selective private university resulting from an observational and interview-based study. I will discuss its complexity,  where and how cognitive biases potentially play a role, and how visual decision-support techniques can potentially be used to mitigate these biases and support the process.

     

    Bio

    Ronald Metoyer, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Notre Dame.  Prof. Metoyer earned his B.S. in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles (1994) and Ph.D. in Computer Science from the Georgia Institute of Technology (2002) where he worked in the Graphics, Visualization and Usability Center.  He previously served on the faculty at Oregon State University in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (2001-2014). Prof. Metoyer’s research addresses problems in human-computer interaction and information visualization, with a focus on multivariate data visualization,  decision making, and narrative. He is the recipient of a 2002 NSF CAREER Award for his work in exploring usability issues around the generation of animated character content for training scenarios. Prof. Metoyer also serves as Assistant Dean in the College of Engineering.

  • Tue
    23
    Oct
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    Please join us for CSCW practice talks on Tuesday, October 23rd.

    Vaishanv Kameswaran: "We can go anywhere": Understanding Understanding Independence through a Case Study of Ride-hailing Use by People with Visual Impairments in metropolitan India.
    Steve Oney: Creating Guided Code Explanations with chat.codes
    Eshwar Chandrasekharan: "The Internet’s Hidden Rules: An Empirical Study of Reddit Norm Violations at Micro, Meso, and Macro Scales".
    Andrea Thomer: Transforming Taxonomic Interfaces: “Arm’s length” cooperative work and the maintenance of a long-lived classification system.
    Jane Im: Deliberation and Resolution on Wikipedia: A Case Study of Requests for Comments

    When and where: October 23 @11:30 AM, North Quad, Ehrlicher Room (North Quad room 3100)

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided at 11:30 AM. Talks will begin at 11:40 AM.
  • Mon
    29
    Oct
    2018
    3:00 pmNQ 4330

    RSVP here

    Principled Data Processing: goals and practices for auditable, replicable, scalable, and transparent data work

    If we have the data and the code, it should be easy to re-calculate results from work we did in the past. In most projects, this turns out to be difficult or impossible. In this workshop, we will discuss principles for data processing: transparency, auditability, replicability, and scalability. I’ll propose a series of practices that help work get closer to these principles. Some of the practices include:

    * [A task is a quantum of workflow](https://hrdag.org/2016/06/14/the-task-is-a-quantum-of-workflow/) standardizing small tasks
    * Using basic unix tools to standardize and link tasks
    * executable documentation: if it runs, it’s true
    * separating data and logic
    * testing: unit-level, file-level, project-level

    Bio

    Patrick Ball has spent more than twenty-five years conducting quantitative analysis for truth commissions, non-governmental organizations, international criminal tribunals, and United Nations missions in El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, South Africa, Chad, Sri Lanka, East Timor, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Kosovo, Liberia, Perú, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Syria. Patrick has provided expert testimony in several trials, including those of Slobodan Milošević, the former President of Serbia; José Efraín Ríos Montt, former de-facto president of Guatemala; and Hissène Habré, the former President of Chad.

    Patrick founded the Human Rights Data Analysis Group (HRDAG) in 1991, where he currently serves as Director of Research.

    In 2018, Patrick received the Karl E. Peace Award for Oustanding Statistical Contributions for the Betterment of Society; in 2015, the Claremont Graduate University awarded Patrick a Doctor of Science (honoris causa); in 2014, he was elected a Fellow of the American Statistical Association; in 2005, the Electronic Frontier Foundation gave him their Pioneer Award; and in 2003, the ACM gave him the Eugene Lawler Award for Humanitarian Contributions within Computer Science and Informatics.

    Patrick is on the Advisory Council of Security Force Monitor, a project of the Columbia Law School Human Rights Institute; a Fellow at the Human Rights Center at Berkeley Law of the University of California-Berkeley; and a Research Fellow at Carnegie Mellon’s Center for Human Rights Science. Patrick received his bachelor of arts degree from Columbia University, and his doctorate from the University of Michigan.

  • Tue
    30
    Oct
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    RSVP here
    Abstract:

    Data about mass violence can seem to offer insights into patterns: is violence getting better, or worse, over time? Is violence directed more against men or women? But in human rights data collection, we (usually) don’t know what we don’t know – and worse, what we don’t know is likely to be systematically different from what we do know.

    This talk will explore the assumption that nearly every project using data must make: that the data are representative of reality in the world. We will explore how, contrary to the standard assumption, statistical patterns in raw data tend to be quite different than patterns in the world. Statistical patterns in data tend to reflect how the data were collected rather than changes in the real-world phenomena data purport to represent.

    Using analysis of mortality in Chadian prisons in the 1980s, killings in Iraq 2005-2010, homicides committed by police in the US 2005-2011, killings in the conflict in Syria, and analysis of genocide in Guatemala in 1982-1983, this talk will contrast patterns in raw data with estimates of total patterns of violence – where the estimates correct for heterogeneous underreporting. The talk will show how biases in raw data can -- sometimes -- be addressed through estimation. The examples will be grounded in their use in public debates and in expert testimony in criminal trials for genocide and war crimes.

    Bio:

    Patrick Ball has spent more than twenty-five years conducting quantitative analysis for truth commissions, non-governmental organizations, international criminal tribunals, and United Nations missions in El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, South Africa, Chad, Sri Lanka, East Timor, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Kosovo, Liberia, Perú, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Syria. Patrick has provided expert testimony in several trials, including those of Slobodan Milošević, the former President of Serbia; José Efraín Ríos Montt, former de-facto president of Guatemala; and Hissène Habré, the former President of Chad.

    Patrick founded the Human Rights Data Analysis Group (HRDAG) in 1991, where he currently serves as Director of Research.

    In 2018, Patrick received the Karl E. Peace Award for Oustanding Statistical Contributions for the Betterment of Society; in 2015, the Claremont Graduate University awarded Patrick a Doctor of Science (honoris causa); in 2014, he was elected a Fellow of the American Statistical Association; in 2005, the Electronic Frontier Foundation gave him their Pioneer Award; and in 2003, the ACM gave him the  Eugene Lawler Award for Humanitarian Contributions within Computer Science and Informatics.

    Patrick is on the Advisory Council of Security Force Monitor, a project of the Columbia Law School Human Rights Institute; a Fellow at the Human Rights Center at Berkeley Law of the University of California-Berkeley; and a Research Fellow at Carnegie Mellon’s Center for Human Rights Science.

    Patrick received his bachelor of arts degree from Columbia University, and his doctorate from the University of Michigan.

  • Tue
    06
    Nov
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

     

     

     

    RSVP here.

    Abstract

    Although tools for working across distance and time are prevalent, inexpensive, and accessible to many, their existence does not guarantee successful intercultural work. Culturally attuned methods are the missing ingredient to bring design teams together across geographic and social borders. Kelly Murdoch-Kitt's ongoing research, in collaboration with Denielle J. Emans (of Virginia Commonwealth University's campus in Doha, Qatar), has identified typical friction points that often emerge in computer-mediated, cross-cultural collaborations. In response, Murdoch-Kitt and Emans have created a series of participatory, design-based methods to enhance cross-cultural collaborations. Hands-on information visualizations—created by students or professional design practitioners involved in intercultural collaborations—are one example of a method that can contribute significantly to improved communications and workflow, as well as a shared sense of community.

    Bio

    Kelly Murdoch Kitt is an Assistant Professor at University of Michigan’s Stamps School of Art and Design. She is drawn to design through her keen interest in people, systems, and interpersonal interactions. Her work and teaching integrate visual communication, interaction, user experience, and service design with behavior change and social engagement, drawing on her previous professional experience as a UX strategist in the San Francisco Bay Area. Murdoch Kitt’s recent research examines and develops methods and tools to promote effective intercultural design collaboration. She enjoys bringing these topics to life for her students through virtual interactions with Professor Denielle Emans’ design classes at Virginia Commonwealth University Qatar. In addition to co authoring chapters for the Routledge Handbook of Sustainable Design and the Springer Handbook of Sustainability and Social Science Research, Murdoch Kitt and Emans were recently jointly recognized by the Design Incubation Teaching Awards for their ongoing intercultural design collaborations in sustainability. They are currently authoring their first book  to document and share their design-based methods for cross-cultural communication, collaboration, and co-creation.

  • Tue
    13
    Nov
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday 11/13, Andrea Grimes Parker from Northeastern University will give a talk on Community Wellness Informatics: Designing Technology for Health Equity.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


    When and wher
    e:

    November 13, 11:30 AM, North Quad, Ehrlicher Room (room 3100) (add to calendar)

    Light lunch will be provided at 11:30 AM. The talk will begin at noon.

    Please RSVP by 12 PM on 11/11 if you will be there.

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested!

     

    Abstract:

    In the United States (U.S.), there are serious and persistent disparities in health outcomes. Socioeconomic status is predictive of mortality and disease, with low-SES households disproportionately experiencing the poorest health outcomes. This inequality is due in large part to social determinants of health—social, physical, and economic conditions that make it more challenging to achieve wellness in low-SES communities. Disruptive innovations are sorely needed to reduce health disparities. Technology, with its growing ubiquity and ability to provide engaging, informative, and empowering experiences for people, presents exciting opportunities for health equity research. However, there has been little Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research examining how software tools should be designed to facilitate health equity in the U.S. by addressing the social determinants of health.

    In this talk, I will present a set of case studies demonstrating how the Wellness Technology Lab is pursuing technology-driven social change through health promotion. These case studies explore how social, mobile, and civic technology can help low-SES communities to both overcome barriers to wellness and address these barriers directly. Using findings from this research, I will articulate opportunities and challenges for a community wellness informatics agenda within HCI.

     

    Bio:

    Andrea Grimes Parker is an Assistant Professor at Northeastern University, with joint appointments in the College of Computer & Information Science and the Bouvé College of Health Sciences. She holds a Ph.D. in Human-Centered Computing from Georgia Tech and a B.S. in Computer Science from Northeastern University. Dr. Parker is the founder and director of the Wellness Technology Lab at Northeastern. Her interdisciplinary research in HCI and Personal Health Informatics examines how social and ubiquitous computing systems can help reduce racial and socio-economic health disparities. Dr. Parker’s research has been funded through grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the Aetna Foundation. Her research has yielded best paper nominations at the ACM CHI and CSCW conferences. From 2014-2016, she served as the National Evaluator for the Aetna Foundation’s portfolio of projects on mobile health interventions in community settings.

     

  • Tue
    20
    Nov
    2018
    11:30 amEhrlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday 11/20, Juan Carlos Torrado Vidal from Universidad Autónoma de Madrid will give a talk on Mobile technologies and cognitive disabilities.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    When and where:

    November 20, 11:30 AM, North Quad, Ehrlicher Room (room 3100) (add to calendar)

    Light lunch will be provided at 11:30 AM. The talk will begin at noon.

    Please RSVP by 12 PM on 11/18 if you will be there.

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested!

    Abstract:

    People with cognitive disabilities face several challenges throughout their lives with the goal of becoming autonomous, self-determined individuals. In the Ambient Intelligence Laboratory (AMILAB) of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid we have developed several application on mobile and wearable platform to assist people with different types of cognitive impairment in their daily-life tasks. Concretely, we have worked on the outdoors and indoors way-finding of people with mild cognitive impairment, the daily life activities micro-prompting of individuals with Down’s Syndrome and the emotional self-regulation of people with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Bio:

    Juan C. Torrado Vidal obtained his PhD on Computer Engineering in Madrid, Spain.  Actually, he is finishing his position as Teaching Assistant there and will become an ERCIM fellow at NTNU University (Norway) in 2019. His main research interests are the development and evaluation of mobile and wearable technologies to aid people with cognitive impairment in their daily lives.

     

  • Tue
    27
    Nov
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    Topic subject to change

     

    Title: Crowdsourcing News Production

    Abstract:
    How do people living in the midst of war use social media, and what can we learn from them to design the next generation of news technologies?  In this presentation, I start by narrating how residents of cities afflicted by the Mexican Drug War use social media to circumvent censorship imposed by powerful drug cartels. I show how people have created effective alert networks to generate real-time reports of violent events, and how some individuals have emerged as a new type of "war correspondent." I end by presenting a number of civic tech systems we have developed inspired by this research.
  • Tue
    04
    Dec
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    TBD

  • Tue
    11
    Dec
    2018
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    TBD