Events

  • Tue
    21
    Feb
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Jasmine will be sharing her work on KidKeeper, a system to capture, select, and deliver everyday family memories with minimal effort and disruption to family life. Teng will be presenting her work on the effects of collectivism and perceived diversity on individual creativity.

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP, so that we will be prepared (add to calendar).

    Jasmine Jones: "Kidkeeper - Helping Parents with young children capture mementos of everyday life"

    Bio

    Jasmine is a PhD candidate at the University of Michigan School of Information, advised by Mark Ackerman. Her work explores socio-technical issues of pervasive computing in everyday life, using a mix of ethnographic and design research methods to better understand the possibilities, challenges, and rewards of technologies embedded in the social fabric of communities.

    Abstract

    Many parents want to capture the candid, fleeting moments in their young children’s lives to treasure later, but these moments are difficult to anticipate and to capture without disruption. We introduce KidKeeper, a toy-like system to capture, select, and deliver everyday family memories with minimal effort and disruption to family life. In our study, we explore how technologies like KidKeeper mediate and align the different interests and values of various family members, namely parents who want precious moments and children who want to play, towards accomplishing a family goal to capture memories of everyday life.

     

    Teng Ye: "Does Collectivism Inhibit Individual Creativity? The Effects of Collectivism and Perceived Diversity on Individual Creativity and Satisfaction in Virtual Ideation Teams"

    Bio

    Teng Ye is a Ph.D. candidate at the School of Information, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (UMSI). She works with Prof. Lionel P. Robert Jr. She is interested in understanding how to motivate users to participate and how to promote their performance in the virtual context, such as in virtual teams, crowdsourcing and the sharing economy. She received a B.S. in Management Information Systems at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China.

    Abstract

    One particular problem CSCW and HCI scholars have sought to address through the design of collaborative systems is the issues associated with diversity and creativity. Diversity can promote creativity by exposing individuals to different perspectives and at the same time make it difficult for teams to leverage their differences to be more creative. This paper asserts that through the promotion of cooperation, collectivism will help ideation team members overcome the challenges associated with diversity and promote creativity. To examine this assertion, we conducted an experimental study involving 107 individuals in 33 idea-generation teams. Collectivism was promoted through priming. The results confirm our assertion: collectivism created conditions that facilitated creativity when teams were high in perceived diversity. Collectivism also facilitated more satisfaction among teammates by offsetting negative perceptions of diversity. These results offer new insights on collectivism, perceived diversity and creativity.

  • Mon
    20
    Feb
    2017
    4:00 pm - 5:30 pm1014 Tisch Hall, Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Meg Jones from Georgetown University will give a talk, co-sponsored with the STS speaker series, on Feb. 20 (Mon), 4:00pm - 5:30pm in 1014 Tisch Hall. (add to calendar).

    Abstract:

    Should people be able to delete or hide personal digital information? When and why? Who should receive digital redemption, under what circumstances? Digital redemption refers to the willingness and means to transform digital public information into private information upon a subject’s request, liberating the individual from discoverable personal information. The legal implementation of digital redemption – the right to be forgotten – is about legally addressing digital information that lingers and threatens to shackle individuals to their past by exposing the information to opaque data processing and online judgment. Developing any right to be forgotten tasks publics and policymakers with sorting through an extraordinary number of circumstances that place many values at stake as controversial issues arise. The three points sorted through in this talk are: 1) that privacy may need to be retroactive – we may not be able to talk about whether someone chose to share something as the crux of a privacy determination; 2) that permanence is a dangerous idea – and when we’re talking about ICTs, always wrong; 3) and that in tackling this vast environment of scenarios and longevity, different legal cultures are coming up with different,  sometimes conflicting, responses that challenge the global web.

     

  • Tue
    10
    Jan
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 2435 (Space 2435), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Sangseok You from the School of Information will be giving a practice job talk on Jan. 10 (Tues), noon-1PM in Space 2435 on methods to increase performance and viability in teams working with robots.

    Light lunch will be provided, please let us know if you will be there (so that we know how much food to prepare!).

    (add to calendar).

    Abstract:

    Robots are increasingly being adopted many types of teams. Unlike other technologies such as group support systems, database systems, and word processors, robots can be unique due to its physical embodiment. Inclusion and interaction with robots can reshape teamwork, which warrants investigations on how teams working with robots promote their performance and facilitate good relationships within teams. In this talk, I will describe my work on examining a few ways to increase performance and viability in teams working with robots. The talk involves a study of emotional attachment to robots that increase team outcomes as the main portion, along with a brief overview of my research agenda that has been developed through years of my Ph.D. study. In the emotional attachment study, I will report results from a lab-experiment with 57 teams working with robots that consisted of two humans and two robots. When performing a collaborative team task, teams that built their robots and perceived team identification felt higher emotional attachment, which resulted in better team performance and viability. My work demonstrates that emotional bonds to the physically embodied artifact can benefit team outcomes, and the benefit requires unique approaches to foster in the context of teams working with robots. I will detail the study and implications for future of teamwork with robots.

     

    Bio:

    Sangseok You is a Ph.D. candidate in information at the University of Michigan School of Information (UMSI), advised by Lionel Robert. His research lies at the intersection of information systems, teams, and human-computer interaction with a focus on understanding how teams working with robot operate and promote the effectiveness of teamwork. He received BBA in Business Administration in 2009 and MS in Human-computer interaction in 2012 from Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea.