Events

  • Tue
    10
    Jan
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 2435 (Space 2435), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Sangseok You from the School of Information will be giving a practice job talk on Jan. 10 (Tues), noon-1PM in Space 2435 on methods to increase performance and viability in teams working with robots.

    Light lunch will be provided, please let us know if you will be there (so that we know how much food to prepare!).

    (add to calendar).

    Abstract:

    Robots are increasingly being adopted many types of teams. Unlike other technologies such as group support systems, database systems, and word processors, robots can be unique due to its physical embodiment. Inclusion and interaction with robots can reshape teamwork, which warrants investigations on how teams working with robots promote their performance and facilitate good relationships within teams. In this talk, I will describe my work on examining a few ways to increase performance and viability in teams working with robots. The talk involves a study of emotional attachment to robots that increase team outcomes as the main portion, along with a brief overview of my research agenda that has been developed through years of my Ph.D. study. In the emotional attachment study, I will report results from a lab-experiment with 57 teams working with robots that consisted of two humans and two robots. When performing a collaborative team task, teams that built their robots and perceived team identification felt higher emotional attachment, which resulted in better team performance and viability. My work demonstrates that emotional bonds to the physically embodied artifact can benefit team outcomes, and the benefit requires unique approaches to foster in the context of teams working with robots. I will detail the study and implications for future of teamwork with robots.

     

    Bio:

    Sangseok You is a Ph.D. candidate in information at the University of Michigan School of Information (UMSI), advised by Lionel Robert. His research lies at the intersection of information systems, teams, and human-computer interaction with a focus on understanding how teams working with robot operate and promote the effectiveness of teamwork. He received BBA in Business Administration in 2009 and MS in Human-computer interaction in 2012 from Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea.

  • Mon
    20
    Feb
    2017
    4:00 pm - 5:30 pm1014 Tisch Hall, Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Meg Jones from Georgetown University will give a talk, co-sponsored with the STS speaker series, on Feb. 20 (Mon), 4:00pm - 5:30pm in 1014 Tisch Hall. (add to calendar).

    Abstract:

    Should people be able to delete or hide personal digital information? When and why? Who should receive digital redemption, under what circumstances? Digital redemption refers to the willingness and means to transform digital public information into private information upon a subject’s request, liberating the individual from discoverable personal information. The legal implementation of digital redemption – the right to be forgotten – is about legally addressing digital information that lingers and threatens to shackle individuals to their past by exposing the information to opaque data processing and online judgment. Developing any right to be forgotten tasks publics and policymakers with sorting through an extraordinary number of circumstances that place many values at stake as controversial issues arise. The three points sorted through in this talk are: 1) that privacy may need to be retroactive – we may not be able to talk about whether someone chose to share something as the crux of a privacy determination; 2) that permanence is a dangerous idea – and when we’re talking about ICTs, always wrong; 3) and that in tackling this vast environment of scenarios and longevity, different legal cultures are coming up with different,  sometimes conflicting, responses that challenge the global web.

     

  • Tue
    21
    Feb
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Jasmine will be sharing her work on KidKeeper, a system to capture, select, and deliver everyday family memories with minimal effort and disruption to family life. Teng will be presenting her work on the effects of collectivism and perceived diversity on individual creativity.

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP, so that we will be prepared (add to calendar).

    Jasmine Jones: "Kidkeeper - Helping Parents with young children capture mementos of everyday life"

    Bio

    Jasmine is a PhD candidate at the University of Michigan School of Information, advised by Mark Ackerman. Her work explores socio-technical issues of pervasive computing in everyday life, using a mix of ethnographic and design research methods to better understand the possibilities, challenges, and rewards of technologies embedded in the social fabric of communities.

    Abstract

    Many parents want to capture the candid, fleeting moments in their young children’s lives to treasure later, but these moments are difficult to anticipate and to capture without disruption. We introduce KidKeeper, a toy-like system to capture, select, and deliver everyday family memories with minimal effort and disruption to family life. In our study, we explore how technologies like KidKeeper mediate and align the different interests and values of various family members, namely parents who want precious moments and children who want to play, towards accomplishing a family goal to capture memories of everyday life.

     

    Teng Ye: "Does Collectivism Inhibit Individual Creativity? The Effects of Collectivism and Perceived Diversity on Individual Creativity and Satisfaction in Virtual Ideation Teams"

    Bio

    Teng Ye is a Ph.D. candidate at the School of Information, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (UMSI). She works with Prof. Lionel P. Robert Jr. She is interested in understanding how to motivate users to participate and how to promote their performance in the virtual context, such as in virtual teams, crowdsourcing and the sharing economy. She received a B.S. in Management Information Systems at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China.

    Abstract

    One particular problem CSCW and HCI scholars have sought to address through the design of collaborative systems is the issues associated with diversity and creativity. Diversity can promote creativity by exposing individuals to different perspectives and at the same time make it difficult for teams to leverage their differences to be more creative. This paper asserts that through the promotion of cooperation, collectivism will help ideation team members overcome the challenges associated with diversity and promote creativity. To examine this assertion, we conducted an experimental study involving 107 individuals in 33 idea-generation teams. Collectivism was promoted through priming. The results confirm our assertion: collectivism created conditions that facilitated creativity when teams were high in perceived diversity. Collectivism also facilitated more satisfaction among teammates by offsetting negative perceptions of diversity. These results offer new insights on collectivism, perceived diversity and creativity.

  • Tue
    14
    Mar
    2017
    12:00pm-1:00pmEhrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

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    Meredith Ringel Morris from Microsoft Research, will give a MISC talk on Mar. 14 (Tues), noon-1PM in NQ 3100. She will discuss her work with the Microsoft Research Enable team on improving the expressivity of augmentative and alternative communication (ACC) for people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP by 12pm on Sun. (3/12), so that we can get a head count.

    (add to calendar)

    Abstract:

    ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is a degenerative neuromuscular disease; people with late-stage ALS typically retain cognitive function, but lose the motor ability to speak, relying on gaze-controlled AAC (augmentative and alternative communication) devices for interpersonal interactions. State-of-the-art AAC technologies used by people with ALS do not facilitate natural communication; gaze-based AAC communication is extremely slow (typically below 20 wpm, compared to 190 wpm for conversational speech), and the resulting synthesized speech is flat and robotic. In this talk, I will present a series of novel technology prototypes from the Microsoft Research Enable team that aim to address the challenges of improving the expressivity of AAC for people with ALS.

    Bio:

    Meredith Ringel Morris is a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, where she is affiliated with the Ability, Enable, and neXus research teams. She is also an affiliate faculty member at the University of Washington, in both the department of Computer Science and Engineering and the School of Information. Dr. Morris earned a Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford University in 2006, and also did her undergraduate work in computer science at Brown University. Her primary research area is human-computer interaction, specifically computer-supported cooperative work and social computing. Her current research focuses on the intersection of CSCW and Accessibility ("social accessibility"), creating technologies that facilitate people with disabilities in connecting with others in social and professional contexts. Past research contributions include foundational work in facilitating cooperative interactions in the domain of surface computing, and in supporting collaborative information retrieval via collaborative web search and friendsourcing. More information about Merrie, including her full list of publications, can be found on her website, http://meredithringelmorris.com.

  • Tue
    21
    Mar
    2017
    12:00pm-1:00pmEhrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

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    Jacob O. Wobbrock from the Information School at University of Washington, will give a MISC talk on Mar. 21 (Tues), noon-1PM in NQ 3100. He will discuss his decade’s worth of projects related to Ability-Based Design, some of which are directed at “people with disabilities” and others are directed at “people in disabling situations.”

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP by 12pm on Sun. (3/19), so that we can get a head count.

    (add to calendar)

    Abstract:

    The term “dis-ability” connotes an absence of ability, but is like saying “dis-money” or “dis-height.” All living people have some abilities. Unfortunately, history is filled with examples of a focus on dis-ability, on what is missing, and on ensuing attempts to replace lost function to make people match a rigid world. Although often well intended, such a focus assumes humans must be adapted, and that interfaces, devices, and environments get to remain as they are. At the same time, our built things embody numerous “ability assumptions” imputed by their designers, and yet our built things remain unaware of their users’ abilities. They also remain unaware of the situations their users are in, or how those situations affect their users’ abilities. An important shift in perspective comes by allowing people to “remain as they are,” asking instead how interfaces, devices, and environments can bear the burden of becoming more suitable to their users’ situated abilities. I call this perspective and the principles that accompany it “Ability-Based Design,” where the human abilities required to use a technology in a given context are questioned, and systems are made operable by or adaptable to alternative abilities. From this perspective, all people have varying degrees of ability, and different situations lead to different ability limitations, some long-term and some momentary. Some ability limitations come mostly from within the self, others from mostly outside the self. Ability-Based Design considers this whole “landscape of ability,” honoring the human at its center and asking more of our technologies. In this talk, I will cover a decade’s worth of projects related to Ability-Based Design, some directed at “people with disabilities” and others directed at “people in disabling situations.” Rather than dive into any one project, I will convey a space of explored possibilities. I will also put forth a grand challenge: that anyone, anywhere, at any time can interact with technologies ideally suited to their specific situated abilities, and that our technologies do the work to achieve this fit. It is our job to ensure they do so.

    Bio:

    Jacob O. Wobbrock is an Associate Professor in the Information School and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington, where he directs the Mobile & Accessible Design Lab. He is a founding member of the design: use: build: Group (DUB Group) and the multi-departmental Master of HCI & Design program at UW.  Dr. Wobbrock’s research seeks to scientifically understand people’s interactions with computers and information, and to improve those interactions through design and engineering, especially for people with disabilities. His specific research topics include interaction techniques, human performance measurement and modeling, HCI research and design methods, mobile computing, and accessible computing. Dr. Wobbrock has co-authored over 120 peer-reviewed publications, receiving 19 paper awards, including 7 best papers and 7 honorable mentions from ACM CHI. For his work on accessible computing, he will receive the 2017 ACM SIGCHI Social Impact Award. He is also the recipient of an NSF CAREER award and five other National Science Foundation grants. He is on the editorial board of ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction. His advisees, to whom he owes his success, have become professors at Harvard, Cornell, Colorado, Maryland, Brown, Simon Fraser, and elsewhere. Dr. Wobbrock received his B.S. in Symbolic Systems and his M.S. in Computer Science from Stanford University; he received his Ph.D. in Human-Computer Interaction from Carnegie Mellon University. Upon graduation, he was honored with CMU’s School of Computer Science Distinguished Dissertation Award.

  • Tue
    28
    Mar
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Edward G. Happ from the School of Information here at the University of Michigan, will give a MISC talk on Mar. 28 (Tues), noon-1PM in NQ 3100.

    Light lunch will be provided, please let us know if you will be there (so that we know how much food to prepare!).

    (add to calendar).

    Abstract:

    If we look at the characteristics of disasters and response, we can gain insights in how to move forward in the midst of disruptive change in our organizations. We will look at crisis, resilience and context sensitive ICT, introduce a framework for information in crises, and ten lessons that can guide us.

    Bio:

    Edward G. Happ is an Executive Fellow at the University of Michigan School of Information, where he is teaching and conducting research.  He is also the Co-founder and former Chairman of NetHope (www.nethope.org), a U.S. based consortium of 50 leading international relief, development and conservation nonprofits focused on information and communications technology (ICT) and collaboration.

    He recently retired as the Global CIO of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (www.ifrc.org), based in Geneva, Switzerland.

    He is the former Chief Information Officer at Save the Children (www.savethechildren.org), in Westport, CT.  During his first year at Save the Children, in March 2001, he presented a paper to Cisco on “Wiring the Virtual Village,” which became the basis for NetHope.

    Before joining Save the Children, he was a senior partner and founder of HP Management Decisions Ltd. (www.hpmd.com), a management consultancy, and has held a variety of corporate management positions, to the Senior Vice President and General Manager level, with Wall Street data providers, service and software product companies.

    His 40 years of professional experience include all facets of managing information services and high technology businesses, including general management with P&L responsibility, operations, product management, sales, marketing, customer service, human resources management, technical consulting, manufacturing, and both software and hardware development.  

    In 2007, the editors of eWEEK, CIO Insight and Baseline selected Mr. Happ as one of the Top 100 Most Influential People in IT and one of the Top 100 CIOs.

    In 2008, the Center for Digital Strategies at the Tuck Business School at Dartmouth appointed Mr. Happ as Executive Fellow and first CIO in residence for the spring term.

    In 2010, the Nonprofit Technology Network (NTEN) honored Mr. Happ with a Lifetime Achievement Award for technology leadership in the nonprofit community.  

    In 2011, he was selected to be a Fellow and Practitioner in Residence at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center, where he began work on a book on collaboration.

    In 2012, Mr. Happ was invited to be a Technical Advisor for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which he served for the five years the TA program ran.

    Since 2008, Mr. Happ has volunteered as a world citizenship and grants judge in the Microsoft Imagine Cup, the world’s largest student software competition.

    From 2012 to April 2016, Mr. Happ was a member of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Technology Partner Network (TPN).

    In 2016, he was honored as a Leadership Fellow for NetHope, an organization he co-founded in 2001.

    He is a recognized thought leader in the NGO sector and the author of numerous articles,  blogs, presentations and publications, including the chapter on the future of IT in the NTEN book Managing Technology to Meet Your Mission.

    He began his career as an Assistant VP, Equity Research at the First Boston Corporation.  Mr. Happ is a graduate of Drew University where he also did graduate work.  He is also the founder and editor of The Fairfield Review (www.fairfieldreview.org), Connecticut’s first on-line literary magazine.  Further information on Mr. Happ may be found on his web page at:  www.eghapp.com.

  • Tue
    04
    Apr
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Lionel P. Robert Jr. from the School of Information here at the University of Michigan, will give a MISC talk on Apr. 4 (Tues), noon-1PM in NQ 3100. He will be discussing his work examining the challenges around autonomous vehicles from the human computer interaction perspective.

    Light lunch will be provided, please let us know if you will be there (so that we know how much food to prepare!).

    (add to calendar).

    Abstract:
    Autonomous vehicles have the potential to help provide our society with safer and more efficient driving. The degree of autonomy can range from partial autonomy acting only to support the driver’s actions to full autonomy allowing the vehicle to drive without any input from the driver. Ultimately, to truly benefit from autonomous vehicles as a society we need to move to a transit system of only fully autonomous vehicles. Despite this there are serious concerns about whether drivers will ever choose to rely on fully autonomous vehicles. Many of these challenges fall squarely into the broad domain of human computer interaction. In this presentation Dr. Robert will present and discuss several of those challenges that he is currently studying. He will also explain the opportunities that exist on campus to study autonomous vehicles at the University of Michigan which is rapidly becoming the world’s hub for autonomous vehicles.

    Bio:
    Dr. Lionel P. Robert, Jr. is currently an Assistant Professor of Information at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, School of Information where he was awarded the Carnegie Junior Faculty Development Fellowship. Dr. Robert was a BAT Fellow and KPMG Scholar at Indiana University where he completed his Ph.D. in Information Systems. He is a member of MISC, Information Behavior and Interaction Research and the Robotics Group at the University of Michigan. He is also an affiliate of the Center for CMC at Indiana University. He is the past president of AIS SIG on Cognitive Research and Representative at Large for the Academy of Management OCIS Division. He is also the current program co-chair for ACM Group 2018. Dr. Robert has published in journals such as Information Systems Research and Journal of the Association of Information Science and Technology as well as conferences such as CSCW & SC and CHI. His research has been sponsored by the U.S. Army, Toyota Research Institute, Mobility Transformation Center, Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies and the National Science Foundation.

  • Wed
    12
    Apr
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 2255, North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

    Youyang Hou and Priyank Chandra from the School of Information will present their papers on Apr. 11 (Tues), noon-1pm, in NQ 2255 (note the location change!).

    Youyang will be presenting her work on the influence of online case resolution system on litigants’ experiences of fairness and emotional feelings toward court officials. Priyank will be sharing his work on the use of landline telephone intercom system as the primary tool for business communications in local markets in the Global South.

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure let us know if you will be coming, so that we can get a headcount.

    (add to calendar)

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    Youyang Hou: "Factors in Fairness and Emotion in Online Case Resolution Systems"

    Bio:

    Youyang Hou is a PhD Candidate at the School of Information, University of Michigan. Her research interests lie in human-computer interaction and CSCW. She is interested in exploring how civic technologies support civic engagement and collaborations between different civic stakeholders. Prior to UMSI, she got his MA in cognitive neuroscience from Michigan State University.

    Abstract:

    Courts are increasingly adopting online information and communication technology, creating a need to consider the potential consequences of these tools for the justice system. Using survey responses from 209 litigants who had recently used an online case resolution system, we investigate factors that influenced litigants’ experiences of fairness and emotional feelings toward court officials. Our results show that ease of using the online case resolution system, the outcome of the case, and a litigant’s perceptions of procedural justice are positively associated both with whether the litigant views the process as fair and whether the litigant ultimately feels positive emotions toward court officials. We also analyze the online explanations litigants offer in their arguments to courts and litigant answers to an open-ended question about their court experiences, and highlight design and practical implications for online systems seeking to improve access to justice.

    Priyank Chandra: "Informality and Invisibility: Traditional Technologies as Tools for Collaboration in an Informal Market"

    Bio:

    Priyank Chandra is a doctoral candidate at University of Michigan’s School of Information. His research is at the intersection of informal institutions and development studies, and primarily focuses on technology appropriation in the Global South. Specifically, he looks at the role of informality in the adoption, consumption, and reproduction of technology. He holds a BE in electronics engineering and MS in economics, with prior experience in data analytics and education research.

    Abstract:

    This paper explores how actors in local markets in the Global South adapt traditional communication technologies to successfully collaborate in sustaining the markets and their business practices. Drawing on ethnographic observations at a local technology goods market in Bangalore, India, the study details the use of a landline telephone intercom system as the primary tool for business communication in the market. Through analyzing how the intercom system relates to informality and physical space, the paper argues that it bridges the formal with the informal, and helps facilitate informal business practices while also allowing them to remain hidden from the formal regulatory gaze of the state.

  • Tue
    18
    Apr
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Carol and Chanda will be presenting their work on choice overload effect in an e-commerce context and discuss how this effect is influenced by an individual’s tendency to maximize or satisfice decisions. Yan will be sharing his work on Codeon, a system that he and his coauthors developed to enable more effective task hand-off between end-user developers and remote helpers by allowing asynchronous responses to on-demand requests.

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP, so that we will be prepared (add to calendar).

    Carol Moser and Chanda Phelan: "No Such Thing as Too Much Chocolate: Evidence Against Choice Overload in E-Commerce"

    Abstract:

    E-commerce designers must decide how many products to display at one time. Choice overload research has demonstrated the surprising finding that more choice is not necessarily better—selecting from larger choice sets can be more cognitively demanding and can result in lower levels of choice satisfaction. This research tests the choice overload effect in an e-commerce context and explores how the choice overload effect is influenced by an individual’s tendency to maximize or satisfice decisions. We conducted an online experiment with 611 participants randomly assigned to select a gourmet chocolate bar from either 12, 24, 40, 50, 60, or 72 different options. Consistent with prior work, we find that maximizers are less satisfied with their product choice than satisficers. However, using Bayesian analysis, we find that it’s unlikely that choice set size affects choice satisfaction by much, if at all. We discuss why the decision-making process may be different in e-commerce contexts than the physical settings used in previous choice overload experiments.

    Bios:

    Carol Moser is a PhD Candidate in Human-Computer Interaction and Social Computing at the University of Michigan School of Information. Carol studies how web design and other sociotechnical factors influence consumer decision-making and behavior online. She is advised by Paul Resnick and Sarita Schoenebeck. Carol is a Rackham Merit Fellow and holds a BA in Communication Studies from the University of Michigan.

    Chanda Phelan is a PhD candidate in human-computer interaction working with Dr. Paul Resnick at UMSI. Her research focus is designing for rural and low-income users, particularly as related to health behavior change. Her current research projects include designing data-driven feedback to increase user motivation and confidence in a strength-training exercise program. She is also a Rackham Merit Fellow. She holds a MS in information economics from UMSI and a BA in English from Pomona College.

     

    Yan Chen: Codeon: On-Demand Software Development Assistance

    Abstract:

    Software developers rely on support from a variety of resources—including other developers—but the coordination cost of finding another developer with relevant experience, explaining the context of the problem, composing a specific help request, and providing access to relevant code is prohibitively high for all but the largest of tasks. In this talk, I'm going to introduce Codeon, a system that we developed to enable more effective task hand-off between end-user developers and remote helpers by allowing asynchronous responses to on-demand requests.

    I will discuss the design process of how we developed the main components in our system, such as what we tried for each feature, what fails, what we decided, etc. Then I will talk about our final system evaluation study and show the results that developers using Codeon completed nearly twice as many tasks as those who used state-of-the-art synchronous video and code sharing tools, by reducing the coordination costs of seeking assistance from other developers.

    Bio:

    Yan Chen is a doctoral student at School of Information, University of Michigan, advised by Dr. Walter S. Lasecki and Dr. Steve Oney. His research spans human-computer interaction, programming collaboration and computing education. In particular, he is interested in creating interactive programming tools to support code specific questions in educational settings by leveraging relevant information (e.g. students' expertise, or code context). He holds a bachelor's degree in Applied Mathematics and Electrical and Computer Engineering, and a master's in Applied Mathematics all from University of Colorado at Boulder.

  • Tue
    26
    Sep
    2017
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    MISC will kick off the year with a series of lightning talks from our new faculty at UMSI. Alain Cohn, Patricia Garcia, Libby Hemphill, David Jurgens, & Andrea Thomer will be giving brief introductions of their research, followed by Q&A and discussion.

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 9/24 if you will be there.

  • Thu
    28
    Sep
    2017
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    RSVP by 12PM on 9/26 if you will be there: https://goo.gl/forms/zqYK3TrNqO1hMCOa2

    Next week, Thursday (9/28 @ 11:30 AM to 1 PM, North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), J. Nathan Matias from Princeton University will give a talk titled Governing Human and Machine Behavior in an Experimenting Society.

    From 11:30 AM to noon, we will have time to grab lunch and mingle/chat with the speaker. The talk starts at noon sharp and ends at 1.

    Speaker Bio:

     

    Nathan, who completed a PhD at the MIT Media Lab and Center for Civic Media, researches factors that contribute to flourishing participation online, developing tested ideas for safe, fair, creative, and effective societies. Starting in September 2017, Nathan will be a post-doctoral researcher at the Princeton Center for Information Technology Policy, as well as the Paluck Lab in psychology and the sociology department.

    Nathan's current projects include large scale experiments on reducing discrimination and harassment online, as well as observational studies on social movements, civic participation, and social change. Nathan regularly liveblogs talks and events and has published journalism in the Atlantic, Guardian, and PBS IdeaLab. He coordinated the Media Lab Festival of Learning in 2012 and 2013.

    Abstract:

     

    We live in a culture that depends on technologies to record our behavior and coordinate our actions with billions of other connected people. Some of these actions perpetuate deep-seated injustices by humans and machines. Our abilities to observe and intervene in other people’s lives also allow us to govern, forcing us to ask how to govern wisely and who should be responsible. In this talk, hear about the history and future of democratic social experimentation, from Kurt Lewin and Karl Popper to Donald Campbell. You’ll also hear about CivilServant, software that supports communities to conduct their own experiments in governing human and machine behavior online. Communities with up to tens of millions of people have used CivilServant to test effective responses for responding to human/algorithmic misinformation, managing the risks of AI-based policy enforcement, preventing harassment, resolving politically-partisan conflict, and changing the behavior of people who engage in hate speech online.

     

  • Tue
    03
    Oct
    2017
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    Please RSVP by 12PM on 10/01 if you will be there :https://goo.gl/forms/WlOZAFokRk70fq3C2

    Light lunch will be provided. On Tuesday (10/03 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Tovi Grossman from University of Toronto will give a talk titled Instrumented and Connected: Designing Next-Generation Learning Experiences.

    From 11:30 AM - noon, we will have a light lunch and informal mingling time.
    The talk starts at noon sharp and ends at 1 PM.

    Speaker Bio:

    Tovi Grossman is a Distinguished Research Scientist at Autodesk Research, located in downtown Toronto. Dr. Grossman’s research is in HCI, focusing on input and interaction with new technologies. In particular, he has been exploring how emerging technologies, such as wearables, the Internet of Things, and gamification can be leveraged to enhance learning and knowledge sharing for both software applications and real-world physical tasks. This work has led to a number of technologies now in Autodesk products used by millions of users, such as Autodesk Screencast and Autodesk ToolClip™ videos. Dr. Grossman received a Ph.D. in Human-Computer Interaction from the Department of Computer Science at the University of Toronto. He has over 90 peer-reviewed journal and conference publications. Fourteen of these publications have received best paper awards and nominations at the ACM UIST and CHI conferences. He has also served as the Technical Program Co-Chair for the ACM CHI 2014 Conference, and the Program Co-Chair for the ACM UIST 2015 Conference.

    Abstract:

    Today, we are moving faster than ever towards Weiser’s seminal vision of technology being woven into the fabric of our everyday lives. Not only have we adopted mobile, and more recently, wearable technologies, that we depend on almost every hour of our waking lives, there is an internet, and more recently, an Internet of Things, that connects us to each other and our surrounding environments. This unique combination of instrumentation and connectivity offers an opportunity to fundamentally change the way in which we learn and share knowledge with one another.

    In this talk, I will outline my research in what I define as next-generation learning experiences, which leverage instrumented and connected environments to aid in human learning and performance. I first demonstrate how instrumented and connected environments can be used to improve the way in which we learn to use complex software applications. I then discuss how wearable and IoT technologies can be similarly leveraged to aid in the learning, performance, and coordination of real-world physical tasks.

    Please join us for this talk on 10/03 @ 11:30 AM

  • Wed
    11
    Oct
    2017
    11:30 am

    On Tuesday (10/10 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Sang Won Lee (our very own MISC coordinator) and Anil Çamci from University of Michigan will give practice talks for their upcoming UIST presentations. Anil Çamci's talk will start at 11:30 AM, so please BE IN THE ROOM BY 11:30 AM for this talk.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 10/08 if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/RTSRt4DSoza9wavp2

    At noon, we will have a short break and distribute MISC t-shirts and hoodies, followed by Sang Won Lee's talk. T-shirts are for everyone. If you already have a hoodie from last year, please let others have the hoodies first. You can also get swags from Matt Kay's office.

    Below are the speaker bios and abstracts for the two talks:

     

    INVISO: A Cross-platform User Interface for Creating Virtual Sonic Environments by Anil Çamci

     

    Speaker Bio:

     

    I am an Assistant Professor of Performing Arts Technology at the University of Michigan. My work investigates new tools and theories for multimodal worldmaking using a variety of media ranging from electronic music to virtual reality. Previously, I was a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Illinois at Chicago's Electronic Visualization Laboratory, where I lead research projects on human-computer interaction and immersive audio in virtual reality contexts. Prior to this appointment, I worked as a faculty member of the Istanbul Technical University, Center for Advanced Studies in Music, where I founded the Sonic Arts program. I completed my PhD at Leiden University in affiliation with the Institute of Sonology in The Hague, and the Industrial Design Department at Delft University of Technology. I hold an MSc degree in Multimedia Engineering from the Media Arts and Technology Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. My work has been presented throughout the world in leading journals, conferences, concerts and exhibitions. I have been granted several awards and scholarships, including the Audio Engineering Society Fellowship, and the ACM CHI Artist Grant.

     

    Abstract:

     

    The predominant interaction paradigm of current audio spatialization tools, which are primarily geared towards expert users, imposes a design process in which users are characterized as stationary, limiting the application domain of these tools. Navigable 3D sonic virtual realities, on the other hand, can support many applications ranging from soundscape prototyping to spatial data representation. Although modern game engines provide a limited set of audio features to create such sonic environments, the interaction methods are inherited from the graphical design features of such systems, and are not specific to the auditory modality. To address such limitations, we introduce INVISO, a novel web-based user interface for designing and experiencing rich and dynamic sonic virtual realities. Our interface enables both novice and expert users to construct complex immersive sonic environments with 3D dynamic sound components. INVISO is platform-independent and facilitates a variety of mixed reality applications, such as those where users can simultaneously experience and manipulate a virtual sonic environment. In this paper, we detail the interface design considerations for our audio-specific VR tool. To evaluate the usability of INVISO, we conduct two user studies: The first demonstrates that our visual interface effectively facilitates the generation of creative audio environments; the second demonstrates that both expert and non-expert users are able to use our software to accurately recreate complex 3D audio scenes.

    SketchExpress: Remixing Animations for More Effective Crowd-Powered Prototyping of Interactive Interfaces by Sang Won Lee


    Speaker Bio:

     

    Sang Won Lee is a Ph.D. Candidate in Computer Science at the University of Michigan. His works lie at the intersection of music and computer science and he has focused on developing interactive systems that mediate musical collaboration and enable novel ways of artistic expression. Also, he has put efforts to bring the collaborative live nature of music-making to other domains and to create computational systems that facilitate real-time collaborative creation for various tasks: from crowdsourcing to programming. He holds a Diploma in Industrial Engineering from the Seoul National University and an M.S. degree in Music Technology from Georgia Tech. He is a musician, who performed numerous times in peer-reviewed venues including NIME, Art-CHI, and ICMC and received the International Computer Music Association Music Award 2016 with his composition, Live Writing: Gloomy Streets.

    Abstract:

    Low-fidelity prototyping at the early stages of user interface (UI) design can help designers and system builders quickly explore their ideas. However, interactive behaviors in such prototypes are often replaced by textual descriptions because it usually takes even professionals hours or days to create animated interactive elements due to the complexity of creating them. In this paper, we introduce SketchExpress, a crowd-powered prototyping tool that enables crowd workers to create reusable interactive behaviors easily and accurately. With the system, a requester—designers or end-users—describes aloud how an interface should behave and crowd workers make the sketched prototype interactive within minutes using a demonstrate-remix-replay approach. These behaviors are manually demonstrated, refined using remix functions, and then can be replayed later. The recorded behaviors persist for future reuse to help users communicate with the animated prototype. We conducted a study with crowd workers recruited from Mechanical Turk, which demonstrated that workers could create animations using SketchExpress in 2.9 minutes on average with 27% gain in the quality of animations compared to the baseline condition of manual demonstration.

     

    Please join us for this talk on 10/10 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    24
    Oct
    2017
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (10/24 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Kate Starbird from University of Washington will give a talk titled Muddied waters: Online rumors, conspiracy theories, and disinformation in the context of crisis response.

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 10/22 if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/5ws0EER62Wrnrgtr1

    Speaker Bio:

     

    Kate Starbird is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE) at the University of Washington (UW). Kate's research is situated within human-computer interaction (HCI) and the emerging field of crisis informatics—the study of the how information-communication technologies (ICTs) are used during crisis events. One aspect of her research focuses on how online rumors spread—and how online rumors are corrected—during natural disasters and man-made crisis events. More recently, she has begun exploring the propagation of “fake news”, disinformation and political propaganda through online spaces. Kate earned her PhD from the University of Colorado at Boulder in Technology, Media and Society and holds a BS in Computer Science from Stanford University.

     

    Abstract:

     

    Social media are now an established feature of crisis response. People—including emergency responders, members of the affected community, and remote onlookers—are repeatedly turning to platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat to seek and share information about crisis events. However, there remain significant challenges to the utility of social media in this context—including rumors and misinformation. Over the last few years, my collaborators and I have conducted extensive research on online rumoring during crisis events, in part focused on how rumors are corrected (or not). Recently, our work has revealed how a specific subsection of the alternative media ecosystem facilitates the spread of disinformation—in the form of conspiracy theories or “alternative narratives” about crisis events—via social media. This disinformation is often employed as part of a political agenda and poses new information security risks. In this talk, I’ll present some of the most significant findings of our research on rumoring, rumor correcting, and the intentional spread of disinformation online during crisis events and discuss some of the implications for emergency and humanitarian responders specifically and regarding trust in information systems more broadly.

     

     

     

    Please join us for this talk on 10/24 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    31
    Oct
    2017
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (10/31 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Nyeema Harris from University of Michigan will give a talk titled Michigan Zoomin: using remote cameras to facilitate wildlife research and public engagement.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 10/29 if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/u5xfA9ku6lmMSvHZ2

     

    Speaker Bio:

     

    I received my PhD from North Carolina State University in 2011 studying the biogeography of carnivores and their parasites. From 2012-2013, I was a NSF and Chancellor’s postdoctoral fellow in the Environmental Science, Policy and Management Department at University of California, Berkeley. Most recently, I completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Luc Hoffmann Institute, WWF International (2014-2015).

     

    Abstract:

     

    The use of remote cameras to study animal populations remains a growing field in ecology. In the Applied Wildlife Ecology (AWE) lab, we deploy cameras across vast geographic scales in Michigan and multiple countries in West Africa to understand the distribution and activity patterns of mammalian carnivores particularly those of conservation concern such as gray wolves and lions, respectively. However, after we complete the laborious field efforts associated with the camera survey then emerges the new challenge of processing millions of the resulting images. We have to manually sort images that have no animals, non-target animal species, or target species. To assist, we created Michigan ZoomIN, a virtual citizen science project to crowdsource identification of images obtained throughout the state. Additional questions now require thoughtful assessment to ensure data accuracy, promote sustained public engagement, and differentiate individuals of the target species. For example, through collaboration, we could study the users of the site by creating profiles of their activity both from identifications and posting on the talk board as well as increase weighting their classifications in a consensus algorithm based on accuracy scores. Other considerations we'd still like to explore include machine learning to find target species only or more simply remove "empty" images, and differentiate individuals of the same species through specific morphometric calculations. Recent advancement in technology can allow for revolutionary transformation for the study of wildlife and enhance impact of such scholarship for conservation and human populations alike.

     

    Please join us for this talk on 10/31 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    07
    Nov
    2017
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (11/07 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Malte Jung from Cornell University will give a talk titled Robots and the Dynamics of Emotions in Teams.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 11/05 if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/o8QktXdYeVhNvF722

     

    Speaker Bio:

     

    Malte Jung is an Assistant Professor in Information Science at Cornell University and the Nancy H. ’62 and Philip M. ’62 Young Sesquicentennial Faculty Fellow. His research focuses on the intersections of teamwork, robots, and emotion. The goal of his research is to inform our basic understanding of robots in work teams as well as to inform how we design technology to support teamwork across a wide range of settings. Malte Jung received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University. Prior to joining Cornell, Malte Jung completed a postdoc at the Center for Work, Technology, and Organization at Stanford University. He holds a Diploma in Mechanical Engineering from the Technical University of Munich and an M.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University.

     

    Abstract:

     

    Over the last decade the idea that robots could become an integral part of teamwork developed from a promising vision into a reality. Robots support teamwork across a wide range of settings covering search and rescue missions, minimally invasive surgeries, space exploration missions, and manufacturing. Scholars have increasingly explored the ways in which robots influence how work in teams is performed, but that work has primarily focused on task specific aspects of team functioning such as the development of situational awareness, common ground, and task coordination. Robots, however, can affect teamwork not only through the task-specific functions they have been developed to serve but also by affecting a team’s regulation of emotion. In this talk I present empirical findings from several studies that show how theory and methods that were originally developed to understand the role of emotions in marital interactions can help us to not only further our understanding of teamwork but also to inform how we design robots to improve teamwork through their emotion regulatory behavior.

     

    Please join us for this talk on 11/07 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    14
    Nov
    2017
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (11/14 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Robin Brewer from University of Michigan will give a talk titled Understanding and Designing for Late-Life Online Engagement.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 11/12 if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/ACvsljoOekIVATt72

     

    Speaker Bio:

     

    I do research at the intersection of social computing and accessibility. As a faculty member and Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow in University of Michigan's School of Information (UMSI), I investigate how to create more meaningful and accessible online communities and voice-based interfaces. My dissertation work focused on developing voice-based systems for older adults with vision impairments. Also, I have studied how crowd work platforms can be more meaningful to novice workers such as older adults.

    Abstract:

     

    The older adult population will grow exponentially in the coming years with more baby boomers reaching retirement age. Yet, our online communities are not well supported for engaging them online. Older adults with internet access struggle to see the value of engaging online. Also, research has shown how seniors who are offline face many barriers to internet use including high cost of internet-enabled devices, lack of access in their homes, and navigating complex interfaces that are difficult to learn. Despite these barriers, prior work has shown how there are social, financial, and health benefits to engaging online, specifically for older adults. In my work, I primarily use qualitative methods (e.g. interviews, observations) combined with quantitative methods (e.g. surveys) and software development to understand people and technology. In this talk, I present my research investigating how to create more accessible online communities for seniors with vision impairments to engage in self-expression and connection, and discuss the implications for future technology development.

     

    Please join us for this talk on 11/14 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    21
    Nov
    2017
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (11/21 @ 11:30 AM. ​North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Jen Romano Bergstrom from Facebook will give a talk titled Out of the Lab and Into the Field to Understand Users’ Perceptions of Privacy.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. PleaseRSVP by 12PM on 11/19 if you will be there​: https://goo.gl/forms/ejYtWcaLIpJgOEma2

     

    Speaker Bio:

     

    Jen Romano-Bergstrom, Experimental Psychologist; UX Research Lead, Facebook/Instagram; President, UXPA International. Jen has over 12 years of experience planning, conducting and managing user-centered research projects. She is currently a UX Researcher at Facebook/Instagram, where she works to understand the UX of Facebook and Instagram in emerging markets. Jen specializes in efficient applications of empirical methods to ensure quality is not lost while working fast to get actionable results. In addition to being a skilled UX researcher and practitioner, Jen specializes in eye tracking, survey design, experimental design, and cognitive aging. Jen frequently presents research and novel methods at academic and industry conferences, and she publishes in peer-reviewed journals, magazines and blogs. She is co-author of Usability Testing for Survey Research (2017) and co-author/editor of Eye Tracking in User Experience Design (2014). She has served on User Experience Professionals Association (UXPA) boards for several years – currently as the President of the International UXPA, and previously Director of Marketing and Communications, as well as President, Vice President, and Conference Chair for UXPA-DC. Jen received a Ph.D. and M.A. in Applied/Experimental Psychology from The Catholic University of America and a B.A. in Psychology from Central Connecticut State University

    Abstract:

     

    Many user experience (UX) researchers and market researchers conduct research in the lab. We conduct interviews and focus groups to understand our users’ opinions and thoughts, and we watch people interact with products to learn about obstacles to completing tasks. We measure subjective data, such as how people report they feel when interacting with a product; we measure observational data, such as time to complete tasks and errors people make; and we measure implicit data, such as where people look and galvanic skin response while people complete tasks. While lab-based studies are well-controlled and can inform product development greatly, we tend to lack a true understanding of how people use the products. To do this, we must go to the users, in their natural environment. In this talk, I will discuss methods we use at Facebook and Instagram to understand users’ perceptions of privacy and privacy settings. I will discuss pros and cons to various research methodologies and share examples from several international markets. While in-the-field methods have the possibility to introduce bias, they provide a rich understanding of the issues people have using products that we simply cannot know from lab-based studies.

     

    Please join us for this talk on 11/21 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    28
    Nov
    2017
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (11/28 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Astrid Weber from Google will give a talk titled Access Denied. Redesigning the digital information offerings for refugees arriving on the European continent.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 11/26 if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/UOS7WxnvO0glsFmQ2

     

    Speaker Bio:

     

    Astrid Weber is a UX Research Manager at Google's headquarters in California. She leads the Youtube Rapid Research team which conducts research on all aspects of the user-facing parts of the platform. Astrid has a Master's degree in Communication Sciences and Design from the University of the Arts in Berlin and a Bachelor of Arts from the Art Institute of Chicago. Her research focuses on accessibility, emerging markets and technology in the context of migration.

     

    Abstract:

     

    In spring 2017 a team of volunteers partnered up with Google.org and the International Rescue Committee to rethink their online information offering for refugees who come to Europe to seek asylum. The goal of the project was to apply human centered design processes to an unstable information environment. Working out of refugee camps in in Athens, Greece and Belgrade, Serbia, the team built learning resources to help designers understand people's' backgrounds, introduce them to their current situations, and future opportunities. In this talk Astrid Weber discusses the ways in which empathy and immersive learning were valuable in redesigning an app to support some of the most marginalized user groups in the world.

     

    Please join us for this talk on 11/28 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    05
    Dec
    2017
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (12/5 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Andy Ko from University of Washington will give a talk titled Learning to code: Why we fail, how we flourish.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 12/3 if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/2zOmfkcvcuE4ZJv73

     

    Speaker Bio:

     

    Andrew J. Ko is an Associate Professor at the University of Washington Information School and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering. He directs the Code & Cognition lab, which studies interactions between people and code, spanning the areas of human-computer interaction, computing education, and software engineering. He is the author of over 90 peer-reviewed publications, 9 receiving best paper awards and 2 receiving most influential paper awards. He received his Ph.D. at the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University in 2008, and degrees in Computer Science and Psychology with Honors from Oregon State University in 2002.

     

    Abstract:

     

    Millions of people are learning to code, but most fail. Why? In this talk I argue that we actually know very little about what programming is or how people learn it. I present my lab's numerous efforts to investigate these problems, including including studies of programming expertise, the failures of classes, bootcamps, books, and coding tutorials at promoting learning, and the challenges of sustaining interest in learning over time. I also present several new tools and techniques for learning to code that can substantially increase learning, productivity, and self-efficacy, including an approach to completely teaching rank novices a programming language in just a few hours. These findings are just a glimpse into the rapidly evolving area of computing education research.

     

    Please join us for this talk on 12/5 @ 11:30 AM