Events

  • Tue
    18
    Apr
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Carol and Chanda will be presenting their work on choice overload effect in an e-commerce context and discuss how this effect is influenced by an individual’s tendency to maximize or satisfice decisions. Yan will be sharing his work on Codeon, a system that he and his coauthors developed to enable more effective task hand-off between end-user developers and remote helpers by allowing asynchronous responses to on-demand requests.

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP, so that we will be prepared (add to calendar).

    Carol Moser and Chanda Phelan: "No Such Thing as Too Much Chocolate: Evidence Against Choice Overload in E-Commerce"

    Abstract:

    E-commerce designers must decide how many products to display at one time. Choice overload research has demonstrated the surprising finding that more choice is not necessarily better—selecting from larger choice sets can be more cognitively demanding and can result in lower levels of choice satisfaction. This research tests the choice overload effect in an e-commerce context and explores how the choice overload effect is influenced by an individual’s tendency to maximize or satisfice decisions. We conducted an online experiment with 611 participants randomly assigned to select a gourmet chocolate bar from either 12, 24, 40, 50, 60, or 72 different options. Consistent with prior work, we find that maximizers are less satisfied with their product choice than satisficers. However, using Bayesian analysis, we find that it’s unlikely that choice set size affects choice satisfaction by much, if at all. We discuss why the decision-making process may be different in e-commerce contexts than the physical settings used in previous choice overload experiments.

    Bios:

    Carol Moser is a PhD Candidate in Human-Computer Interaction and Social Computing at the University of Michigan School of Information. Carol studies how web design and other sociotechnical factors influence consumer decision-making and behavior online. She is advised by Paul Resnick and Sarita Schoenebeck. Carol is a Rackham Merit Fellow and holds a BA in Communication Studies from the University of Michigan.

    Chanda Phelan is a PhD candidate in human-computer interaction working with Dr. Paul Resnick at UMSI. Her research focus is designing for rural and low-income users, particularly as related to health behavior change. Her current research projects include designing data-driven feedback to increase user motivation and confidence in a strength-training exercise program. She is also a Rackham Merit Fellow. She holds a MS in information economics from UMSI and a BA in English from Pomona College.

     

    Yan Chen: Codeon: On-Demand Software Development Assistance

    Abstract:

    Software developers rely on support from a variety of resources—including other developers—but the coordination cost of finding another developer with relevant experience, explaining the context of the problem, composing a specific help request, and providing access to relevant code is prohibitively high for all but the largest of tasks. In this talk, I'm going to introduce Codeon, a system that we developed to enable more effective task hand-off between end-user developers and remote helpers by allowing asynchronous responses to on-demand requests.

    I will discuss the design process of how we developed the main components in our system, such as what we tried for each feature, what fails, what we decided, etc. Then I will talk about our final system evaluation study and show the results that developers using Codeon completed nearly twice as many tasks as those who used state-of-the-art synchronous video and code sharing tools, by reducing the coordination costs of seeking assistance from other developers.

    Bio:

    Yan Chen is a doctoral student at School of Information, University of Michigan, advised by Dr. Walter S. Lasecki and Dr. Steve Oney. His research spans human-computer interaction, programming collaboration and computing education. In particular, he is interested in creating interactive programming tools to support code specific questions in educational settings by leveraging relevant information (e.g. students' expertise, or code context). He holds a bachelor's degree in Applied Mathematics and Electrical and Computer Engineering, and a master's in Applied Mathematics all from University of Colorado at Boulder.

  • Wed
    12
    Apr
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 2255, North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

    Youyang Hou and Priyank Chandra from the School of Information will present their papers on Apr. 11 (Tues), noon-1pm, in NQ 2255 (note the location change!).

    Youyang will be presenting her work on the influence of online case resolution system on litigants’ experiences of fairness and emotional feelings toward court officials. Priyank will be sharing his work on the use of landline telephone intercom system as the primary tool for business communications in local markets in the Global South.

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure let us know if you will be coming, so that we can get a headcount.

    (add to calendar)

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    Youyang Hou: "Factors in Fairness and Emotion in Online Case Resolution Systems"

    Bio:

    Youyang Hou is a PhD Candidate at the School of Information, University of Michigan. Her research interests lie in human-computer interaction and CSCW. She is interested in exploring how civic technologies support civic engagement and collaborations between different civic stakeholders. Prior to UMSI, she got his MA in cognitive neuroscience from Michigan State University.

    Abstract:

    Courts are increasingly adopting online information and communication technology, creating a need to consider the potential consequences of these tools for the justice system. Using survey responses from 209 litigants who had recently used an online case resolution system, we investigate factors that influenced litigants’ experiences of fairness and emotional feelings toward court officials. Our results show that ease of using the online case resolution system, the outcome of the case, and a litigant’s perceptions of procedural justice are positively associated both with whether the litigant views the process as fair and whether the litigant ultimately feels positive emotions toward court officials. We also analyze the online explanations litigants offer in their arguments to courts and litigant answers to an open-ended question about their court experiences, and highlight design and practical implications for online systems seeking to improve access to justice.

    Priyank Chandra: "Informality and Invisibility: Traditional Technologies as Tools for Collaboration in an Informal Market"

    Bio:

    Priyank Chandra is a doctoral candidate at University of Michigan’s School of Information. His research is at the intersection of informal institutions and development studies, and primarily focuses on technology appropriation in the Global South. Specifically, he looks at the role of informality in the adoption, consumption, and reproduction of technology. He holds a BE in electronics engineering and MS in economics, with prior experience in data analytics and education research.

    Abstract:

    This paper explores how actors in local markets in the Global South adapt traditional communication technologies to successfully collaborate in sustaining the markets and their business practices. Drawing on ethnographic observations at a local technology goods market in Bangalore, India, the study details the use of a landline telephone intercom system as the primary tool for business communication in the market. Through analyzing how the intercom system relates to informality and physical space, the paper argues that it bridges the formal with the informal, and helps facilitate informal business practices while also allowing them to remain hidden from the formal regulatory gaze of the state.

  • Tue
    04
    Apr
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Lionel P. Robert Jr. from the School of Information here at the University of Michigan, will give a MISC talk on Apr. 4 (Tues), noon-1PM in NQ 3100. He will be discussing his work examining the challenges around autonomous vehicles from the human computer interaction perspective.

    Light lunch will be provided, please let us know if you will be there (so that we know how much food to prepare!).

    (add to calendar).

    Abstract:
    Autonomous vehicles have the potential to help provide our society with safer and more efficient driving. The degree of autonomy can range from partial autonomy acting only to support the driver’s actions to full autonomy allowing the vehicle to drive without any input from the driver. Ultimately, to truly benefit from autonomous vehicles as a society we need to move to a transit system of only fully autonomous vehicles. Despite this there are serious concerns about whether drivers will ever choose to rely on fully autonomous vehicles. Many of these challenges fall squarely into the broad domain of human computer interaction. In this presentation Dr. Robert will present and discuss several of those challenges that he is currently studying. He will also explain the opportunities that exist on campus to study autonomous vehicles at the University of Michigan which is rapidly becoming the world’s hub for autonomous vehicles.

    Bio:
    Dr. Lionel P. Robert, Jr. is currently an Assistant Professor of Information at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, School of Information where he was awarded the Carnegie Junior Faculty Development Fellowship. Dr. Robert was a BAT Fellow and KPMG Scholar at Indiana University where he completed his Ph.D. in Information Systems. He is a member of MISC, Information Behavior and Interaction Research and the Robotics Group at the University of Michigan. He is also an affiliate of the Center for CMC at Indiana University. He is the past president of AIS SIG on Cognitive Research and Representative at Large for the Academy of Management OCIS Division. He is also the current program co-chair for ACM Group 2018. Dr. Robert has published in journals such as Information Systems Research and Journal of the Association of Information Science and Technology as well as conferences such as CSCW & SC and CHI. His research has been sponsored by the U.S. Army, Toyota Research Institute, Mobility Transformation Center, Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies and the National Science Foundation.

  • Tue
    28
    Mar
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Edward G. Happ from the School of Information here at the University of Michigan, will give a MISC talk on Mar. 28 (Tues), noon-1PM in NQ 3100.

    Light lunch will be provided, please let us know if you will be there (so that we know how much food to prepare!).

    (add to calendar).

    Abstract:

    If we look at the characteristics of disasters and response, we can gain insights in how to move forward in the midst of disruptive change in our organizations. We will look at crisis, resilience and context sensitive ICT, introduce a framework for information in crises, and ten lessons that can guide us.

    Bio:

    Edward G. Happ is an Executive Fellow at the University of Michigan School of Information, where he is teaching and conducting research.  He is also the Co-founder and former Chairman of NetHope (www.nethope.org), a U.S. based consortium of 50 leading international relief, development and conservation nonprofits focused on information and communications technology (ICT) and collaboration.

    He recently retired as the Global CIO of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (www.ifrc.org), based in Geneva, Switzerland.

    He is the former Chief Information Officer at Save the Children (www.savethechildren.org), in Westport, CT.  During his first year at Save the Children, in March 2001, he presented a paper to Cisco on “Wiring the Virtual Village,” which became the basis for NetHope.

    Before joining Save the Children, he was a senior partner and founder of HP Management Decisions Ltd. (www.hpmd.com), a management consultancy, and has held a variety of corporate management positions, to the Senior Vice President and General Manager level, with Wall Street data providers, service and software product companies.

    His 40 years of professional experience include all facets of managing information services and high technology businesses, including general management with P&L responsibility, operations, product management, sales, marketing, customer service, human resources management, technical consulting, manufacturing, and both software and hardware development.  

    In 2007, the editors of eWEEK, CIO Insight and Baseline selected Mr. Happ as one of the Top 100 Most Influential People in IT and one of the Top 100 CIOs.

    In 2008, the Center for Digital Strategies at the Tuck Business School at Dartmouth appointed Mr. Happ as Executive Fellow and first CIO in residence for the spring term.

    In 2010, the Nonprofit Technology Network (NTEN) honored Mr. Happ with a Lifetime Achievement Award for technology leadership in the nonprofit community.  

    In 2011, he was selected to be a Fellow and Practitioner in Residence at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center, where he began work on a book on collaboration.

    In 2012, Mr. Happ was invited to be a Technical Advisor for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which he served for the five years the TA program ran.

    Since 2008, Mr. Happ has volunteered as a world citizenship and grants judge in the Microsoft Imagine Cup, the world’s largest student software competition.

    From 2012 to April 2016, Mr. Happ was a member of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Technology Partner Network (TPN).

    In 2016, he was honored as a Leadership Fellow for NetHope, an organization he co-founded in 2001.

    He is a recognized thought leader in the NGO sector and the author of numerous articles,  blogs, presentations and publications, including the chapter on the future of IT in the NTEN book Managing Technology to Meet Your Mission.

    He began his career as an Assistant VP, Equity Research at the First Boston Corporation.  Mr. Happ is a graduate of Drew University where he also did graduate work.  He is also the founder and editor of The Fairfield Review (www.fairfieldreview.org), Connecticut’s first on-line literary magazine.  Further information on Mr. Happ may be found on his web page at:  www.eghapp.com.

  • Tue
    21
    Mar
    2017
    12:00pm-1:00pmEhrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

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    Jacob O. Wobbrock from the Information School at University of Washington, will give a MISC talk on Mar. 21 (Tues), noon-1PM in NQ 3100. He will discuss his decade’s worth of projects related to Ability-Based Design, some of which are directed at “people with disabilities” and others are directed at “people in disabling situations.”

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP by 12pm on Sun. (3/19), so that we can get a head count.

    (add to calendar)

    Abstract:

    The term “dis-ability” connotes an absence of ability, but is like saying “dis-money” or “dis-height.” All living people have some abilities. Unfortunately, history is filled with examples of a focus on dis-ability, on what is missing, and on ensuing attempts to replace lost function to make people match a rigid world. Although often well intended, such a focus assumes humans must be adapted, and that interfaces, devices, and environments get to remain as they are. At the same time, our built things embody numerous “ability assumptions” imputed by their designers, and yet our built things remain unaware of their users’ abilities. They also remain unaware of the situations their users are in, or how those situations affect their users’ abilities. An important shift in perspective comes by allowing people to “remain as they are,” asking instead how interfaces, devices, and environments can bear the burden of becoming more suitable to their users’ situated abilities. I call this perspective and the principles that accompany it “Ability-Based Design,” where the human abilities required to use a technology in a given context are questioned, and systems are made operable by or adaptable to alternative abilities. From this perspective, all people have varying degrees of ability, and different situations lead to different ability limitations, some long-term and some momentary. Some ability limitations come mostly from within the self, others from mostly outside the self. Ability-Based Design considers this whole “landscape of ability,” honoring the human at its center and asking more of our technologies. In this talk, I will cover a decade’s worth of projects related to Ability-Based Design, some directed at “people with disabilities” and others directed at “people in disabling situations.” Rather than dive into any one project, I will convey a space of explored possibilities. I will also put forth a grand challenge: that anyone, anywhere, at any time can interact with technologies ideally suited to their specific situated abilities, and that our technologies do the work to achieve this fit. It is our job to ensure they do so.

    Bio:

    Jacob O. Wobbrock is an Associate Professor in the Information School and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington, where he directs the Mobile & Accessible Design Lab. He is a founding member of the design: use: build: Group (DUB Group) and the multi-departmental Master of HCI & Design program at UW.  Dr. Wobbrock’s research seeks to scientifically understand people’s interactions with computers and information, and to improve those interactions through design and engineering, especially for people with disabilities. His specific research topics include interaction techniques, human performance measurement and modeling, HCI research and design methods, mobile computing, and accessible computing. Dr. Wobbrock has co-authored over 120 peer-reviewed publications, receiving 19 paper awards, including 7 best papers and 7 honorable mentions from ACM CHI. For his work on accessible computing, he will receive the 2017 ACM SIGCHI Social Impact Award. He is also the recipient of an NSF CAREER award and five other National Science Foundation grants. He is on the editorial board of ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction. His advisees, to whom he owes his success, have become professors at Harvard, Cornell, Colorado, Maryland, Brown, Simon Fraser, and elsewhere. Dr. Wobbrock received his B.S. in Symbolic Systems and his M.S. in Computer Science from Stanford University; he received his Ph.D. in Human-Computer Interaction from Carnegie Mellon University. Upon graduation, he was honored with CMU’s School of Computer Science Distinguished Dissertation Award.

  • Tue
    14
    Mar
    2017
    12:00pm-1:00pmEhrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

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    Meredith Ringel Morris from Microsoft Research, will give a MISC talk on Mar. 14 (Tues), noon-1PM in NQ 3100. She will discuss her work with the Microsoft Research Enable team on improving the expressivity of augmentative and alternative communication (ACC) for people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP by 12pm on Sun. (3/12), so that we can get a head count.

    (add to calendar)

    Abstract:

    ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is a degenerative neuromuscular disease; people with late-stage ALS typically retain cognitive function, but lose the motor ability to speak, relying on gaze-controlled AAC (augmentative and alternative communication) devices for interpersonal interactions. State-of-the-art AAC technologies used by people with ALS do not facilitate natural communication; gaze-based AAC communication is extremely slow (typically below 20 wpm, compared to 190 wpm for conversational speech), and the resulting synthesized speech is flat and robotic. In this talk, I will present a series of novel technology prototypes from the Microsoft Research Enable team that aim to address the challenges of improving the expressivity of AAC for people with ALS.

    Bio:

    Meredith Ringel Morris is a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, where she is affiliated with the Ability, Enable, and neXus research teams. She is also an affiliate faculty member at the University of Washington, in both the department of Computer Science and Engineering and the School of Information. Dr. Morris earned a Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford University in 2006, and also did her undergraduate work in computer science at Brown University. Her primary research area is human-computer interaction, specifically computer-supported cooperative work and social computing. Her current research focuses on the intersection of CSCW and Accessibility ("social accessibility"), creating technologies that facilitate people with disabilities in connecting with others in social and professional contexts. Past research contributions include foundational work in facilitating cooperative interactions in the domain of surface computing, and in supporting collaborative information retrieval via collaborative web search and friendsourcing. More information about Merrie, including her full list of publications, can be found on her website, http://meredithringelmorris.com.

  • Tue
    21
    Feb
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Jasmine will be sharing her work on KidKeeper, a system to capture, select, and deliver everyday family memories with minimal effort and disruption to family life. Teng will be presenting her work on the effects of collectivism and perceived diversity on individual creativity.

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP, so that we will be prepared (add to calendar).

    Jasmine Jones: "Kidkeeper - Helping Parents with young children capture mementos of everyday life"

    Bio

    Jasmine is a PhD candidate at the University of Michigan School of Information, advised by Mark Ackerman. Her work explores socio-technical issues of pervasive computing in everyday life, using a mix of ethnographic and design research methods to better understand the possibilities, challenges, and rewards of technologies embedded in the social fabric of communities.

    Abstract

    Many parents want to capture the candid, fleeting moments in their young children’s lives to treasure later, but these moments are difficult to anticipate and to capture without disruption. We introduce KidKeeper, a toy-like system to capture, select, and deliver everyday family memories with minimal effort and disruption to family life. In our study, we explore how technologies like KidKeeper mediate and align the different interests and values of various family members, namely parents who want precious moments and children who want to play, towards accomplishing a family goal to capture memories of everyday life.

     

    Teng Ye: "Does Collectivism Inhibit Individual Creativity? The Effects of Collectivism and Perceived Diversity on Individual Creativity and Satisfaction in Virtual Ideation Teams"

    Bio

    Teng Ye is a Ph.D. candidate at the School of Information, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (UMSI). She works with Prof. Lionel P. Robert Jr. She is interested in understanding how to motivate users to participate and how to promote their performance in the virtual context, such as in virtual teams, crowdsourcing and the sharing economy. She received a B.S. in Management Information Systems at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China.

    Abstract

    One particular problem CSCW and HCI scholars have sought to address through the design of collaborative systems is the issues associated with diversity and creativity. Diversity can promote creativity by exposing individuals to different perspectives and at the same time make it difficult for teams to leverage their differences to be more creative. This paper asserts that through the promotion of cooperation, collectivism will help ideation team members overcome the challenges associated with diversity and promote creativity. To examine this assertion, we conducted an experimental study involving 107 individuals in 33 idea-generation teams. Collectivism was promoted through priming. The results confirm our assertion: collectivism created conditions that facilitated creativity when teams were high in perceived diversity. Collectivism also facilitated more satisfaction among teammates by offsetting negative perceptions of diversity. These results offer new insights on collectivism, perceived diversity and creativity.

  • Mon
    20
    Feb
    2017
    4:00 pm - 5:30 pm1014 Tisch Hall, Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Meg Jones from Georgetown University will give a talk, co-sponsored with the STS speaker series, on Feb. 20 (Mon), 4:00pm - 5:30pm in 1014 Tisch Hall. (add to calendar).

    Abstract:

    Should people be able to delete or hide personal digital information? When and why? Who should receive digital redemption, under what circumstances? Digital redemption refers to the willingness and means to transform digital public information into private information upon a subject’s request, liberating the individual from discoverable personal information. The legal implementation of digital redemption – the right to be forgotten – is about legally addressing digital information that lingers and threatens to shackle individuals to their past by exposing the information to opaque data processing and online judgment. Developing any right to be forgotten tasks publics and policymakers with sorting through an extraordinary number of circumstances that place many values at stake as controversial issues arise. The three points sorted through in this talk are: 1) that privacy may need to be retroactive – we may not be able to talk about whether someone chose to share something as the crux of a privacy determination; 2) that permanence is a dangerous idea – and when we’re talking about ICTs, always wrong; 3) and that in tackling this vast environment of scenarios and longevity, different legal cultures are coming up with different,  sometimes conflicting, responses that challenge the global web.

     

  • Tue
    10
    Jan
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 2435 (Space 2435), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Sangseok You from the School of Information will be giving a practice job talk on Jan. 10 (Tues), noon-1PM in Space 2435 on methods to increase performance and viability in teams working with robots.

    Light lunch will be provided, please let us know if you will be there (so that we know how much food to prepare!).

    (add to calendar).

    Abstract:

    Robots are increasingly being adopted many types of teams. Unlike other technologies such as group support systems, database systems, and word processors, robots can be unique due to its physical embodiment. Inclusion and interaction with robots can reshape teamwork, which warrants investigations on how teams working with robots promote their performance and facilitate good relationships within teams. In this talk, I will describe my work on examining a few ways to increase performance and viability in teams working with robots. The talk involves a study of emotional attachment to robots that increase team outcomes as the main portion, along with a brief overview of my research agenda that has been developed through years of my Ph.D. study. In the emotional attachment study, I will report results from a lab-experiment with 57 teams working with robots that consisted of two humans and two robots. When performing a collaborative team task, teams that built their robots and perceived team identification felt higher emotional attachment, which resulted in better team performance and viability. My work demonstrates that emotional bonds to the physically embodied artifact can benefit team outcomes, and the benefit requires unique approaches to foster in the context of teams working with robots. I will detail the study and implications for future of teamwork with robots.

     

    Bio:

    Sangseok You is a Ph.D. candidate in information at the University of Michigan School of Information (UMSI), advised by Lionel Robert. His research lies at the intersection of information systems, teams, and human-computer interaction with a focus on understanding how teams working with robot operate and promote the effectiveness of teamwork. He received BBA in Business Administration in 2009 and MS in Human-computer interaction in 2012 from Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea.