Events

  • Thu
    10
    Dec
    2015
    9:00am-10:30amVideo Viewing Room, Language Resource Center 1500 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    Abstract:
    PaGamO, a game designed for engaging online learners in Coursera, won the Overall Award of the Wharton-QS “Reimagine Education” because of its innovative use of gamification. Further, in response to the need of K-12 learners, more features have been developed, and the collaboration with textbook publishers is underway. The renowned platform is developed by the team led by Prof. Ping-Cheng (Benson) Yeh, a U-M alumnus, making a positive impact on educational innovation. In this talk, Prof. Yeh will share with us his work and experience in gamification for education, and also his extensive experience of collaborating with school teachers.

    Bio:
    Prof. Ping-Cheng (Benson) Yeh is a professor in the Department of Electronic Engineering and also the MOOC program director at the National Taiwan University (NTU) with a great passion for teaching. He is one of the world’s leading innovators in modern education and e-learning and he has pioneered many educational experiments and designs:
    - He is the first to win the Overall Award and E-Learning Award in "Wharton-QS 2014 Stars Awards: Reimagine Education", the "Oscars” of innovations in higher education.
    - He is the first in the world to design an MOOC-based multi-student social game to enhance the learning experience of thousands of students on Coursera.
    - He is the first to design a serious game with multi-student social features that can be applied to any courses, used by UPenn. and other universities.
    - He has set the record in Taiwan of more than 2,200 teachers participating in one talk.

  • Tue
    08
    Dec
    2015
    12:00pm-1:00pmEhrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    What happens to our accounts, data, and digital identities after we die? Jed Brubaker is an Assistant Professor and founding member of the department of Information Science at the University of Colorado Boulder. He conducts research in social informatics, social media, and infrastructure studies focusing on how identity is designed, represented, and experienced in socio-technical systems. During this talk, he will discuss what death tells us about the technological design of identity, how identity infrastructure shapes the ways the user is operationalized, and the importance of future research that accounts for the infrastructure that undergirds user-centered research and practice.

  • Tue
    17
    Nov
    2015
    12:00pm-1:00pm2435 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    Abstract:
    Building on intersections between science and technology studies and design, this presentation explores several modes of theorizing making and making theory through the creation of and engagement with socio-technical artifacts. The first mode, about technology, discusses participatory and speculative practices related to a workshop on the future of work. The second mode, with technology, engages in digital design and fabrication from a project on computational fashion. The third mode, becoming technology, uses autobiographical design to reflect on disability and medical devices from the perspective of feminist (un)hacking. This presentation reflects on the aesthetics and cosmopolitics of these varied design practices as ways of inquiring about the world, building knowledge and prototyping alternative possible futures that embed values, ethics and responsibilities. These accounts serve to reconfigure traditional understandings of human-centered design and human-computer interaction towards practices that open up spaces for a deeper consideration of the importance of the role of the non-human in emergent design practices.

    Bio:
    Forlano is an Assistant Professor of Design at the Institute of Design and Affiliated Faculty in the College of Architecture at Illinois Institute of Technology where she is Director of the Critical Futures Lab. From 2012-2013, she was a Visiting Scholar in the Comparative Media Studies program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research is focused on the intersection between emerging technologies, material practices and the future of cities. She is co-editor with Marcus Foth, Christine Satchell and Martin Gibbs of From Social Butterfly to Engaged Citizen: Urban Informatics, Social Media, Ubiquitous Computing, and Mobile Technology to Support Citizen Engagement (MIT Press 2011). Forlano’s research and writing has been published in peer-reviewed journals including Design Issues, the Journal of Peer Production, Fibreculture, Digital Culture & Society, ADA, Journal of Urban Technology, First Monday, The Information Society, Journal of Community Informatics, IEEE Pervasive Computing and Science and Public Policy. She has published chapters for books including editor Mark Shepard’s Sentient City: Ubiquitous Computing, Architecture, and the Future of Urban Space (MIT Press 2011) and The Architecture League of New York’s Situated Technologies pamphlet series and is a regular contributor to their Urban Omnibus blog. She received her Ph.D. in communications from Columbia University.

    This presentation was recorded and you can view it here

  • Fri
    13
    Nov
    2015
    12:00pm-1:00pm2435 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    This coming Friday (11/13 @ noon, NQ 2255), SOCHI, in partnership with MISC, will host student teams to present their project milestone for the CHI 2016 student design competition. Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! (Add to calendar) Light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis.

    The teams are seeking feedback -- hope you can attend!

  • Tue
    10
    Nov
    2015
    12:00pm-1:00pm2435 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    Abstract:
    Card, Moran, & Newell’s seminal 1983 work, The Psychology of Human-Computer Interaction, coincided with the emergence of the HCI field. They proposed assessing usability through models of human performance based on psychological science. This concept, known as “engineering models” for usability, underwent extensive development in the subsequent decades, but it has not been widely adopted by user interface developers. In this talk, I’ll briefly summarize the concept and its scientific development, and suggest where it has much to contribute, and speculate on why it is not widely adopted.

    Bio:
    David Kieras is a Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of Michigan, with a joint appointment in the Department of Psychology. He conducts research in the area of applied and theoretical cognitive psychology, with specific interests in human-computer interaction, cognitive simulation modeling, human performance, complex human learning, and natural language processing. Among the HCI research community, he is well known for Cognitive Complexity Theory, the GOMS model, and EPIC cognitive architecture. For his seminal contributions, he was inducted into the CHI Academy, which honors individuals who have made extensive contributions to the study of HCI and who have led the shaping of the field.

  • Tue
    03
    Nov
    2015
    12:00pm-1:00pm2435 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    Abstract:
    Many of the important themes that have sustained CSCW field-based research for the last 25 years are largely tapped out. To be sure, there are still great studies, such as those that will be at CSCW'16. Yet, we have seen many papers on awareness, online norms, and so on. There are those who feel that the CSCW work studies and other interpretivist research streams are in decline; many interpretivist studies are small incremental elaborations over previous studies or studies that elaborate known findings in new subject domains (such as medicine or education).

    In this talk, I want to consider some ways to revitalize the CSCW interpretivist research agenda. Many efforts are already ongoing in the CSCW community.

    To do this, I will use symbolic interactionist (SI) theory as a case study of sorts to guide the discussion, as recent theoretical developments have moved to update "classic" SI (which would correspond to, roughly, updating the so-called second Chicago School) with the postmodern and practice turns. I find the moves in this update important; they generalize to CSCW socio-technical considerations as well. I also consider why extending a standard CSCW micro-sociological basis it is likely to be valuable to CSCW interpretivist work by expanding previous understandings and opening up new questions.

    This work is joint with Liz Kaziunas and Melissa Chalmers

    Bio:
    Mark Ackerman is the George Herbert Mead Collegiate Professor of Human-Computer Interaction and a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and in the School of Information at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His major research area is Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), primarily Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). He has published widely in HCI and CSCW, investigating collaborative information access in online knowledge communities, medical settings, expertise sharing, and most recently, pervasive environments. Mark is a member of the CHI Academy (HCI Fellow) and an ACM Fellow.

    Previously, Mark was a faculty member at the University of California, Irvine, and a research scientist at MIT's Laboratory for Computer Science (now CSAIL). Before becoming an academic, Mark led the development of the first home banking system, had three Billboard Top-10 games for the Atari 2600, and worked on the X Window System's first user-interface widget set. Mark has degrees from the University of Chicago, Ohio State, and MIT.

    This presentation was recorded and you can view it here

  • Tue
    06
    Oct
    2015
    12:00pm-1:00pmEhrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    Abstract:
    News consumers can engage in such self-imposed ideological segregation that it invites partisan differences in perceptions of reality. With the proliferation of digital platforms and mobile communication, people are given increasing opportunity to limit their information exposure to attitudes and opinions that reinforce, rather than challenge, their preexisting beliefs. Whithervanes is a public platform that will connect ambient digital information submitted from all over the planet in real time to physical manifestations of that data. This challenging endeavor is designed to create a global network that draws attention to the role that data is playing in reshaping the world around us. In phase 1 of the project five 21st Century weathervanes (in the form of headless chickens) were controlled by the climate of fear on the Internet. They were presented on five buildings during the 2014 Folkestone Triennial from 30 August – 2 November 2014. Phase 2 will see this project develop from a project to an open software and hardware platform. Whithervanes seeks to impact the sociotechnical imaginary between what the news media tells us, and our capacity to imagine and produce collective visions of desirable futures.

    Bio:
    John Marshall’s creative and scholarly work is design research that results in both interactive installations and publications. Marshall’s studio practice involves a recursive process where multiple stakeholders work together to realize shared goals. Since 1998, Marshall has co-directed rootoftwo, LLC - a hybrid design studio. Marshall is also a partner in r+d LAB, LLC. Recent projects have been featured in Wired, FastCompany, Dezeen, Dwell, Studio International and The Guardian. In 2015 r+d LAB, LLC was selected by Midtown Detroit, Inc. and the New Economy Initiative to transform the undersides of two viaducts located in Midtown Detroit’s TechTown district with an interactive light installation. Marshall is an Associate Professor at the Stamps School of Art & Design; an Associate Professor at the Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning; and Director of the Stamps MDes Integrative Design program at the University of Michigan.