Events

  • Tue
    21
    Feb
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Jasmine will be sharing her work on KidKeeper, a system to capture, select, and deliver everyday family memories with minimal effort and disruption to family life. Teng will be presenting her work on the effects of collectivism and perceived diversity on individual creativity.

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP, so that we will be prepared (add to calendar).

    Jasmine Jones: "Kidkeeper - Helping Parents with young children capture mementos of everyday life"

    Bio

    Jasmine is a PhD candidate at the University of Michigan School of Information, advised by Mark Ackerman. Her work explores socio-technical issues of pervasive computing in everyday life, using a mix of ethnographic and design research methods to better understand the possibilities, challenges, and rewards of technologies embedded in the social fabric of communities.

    Abstract

    Many parents want to capture the candid, fleeting moments in their young children’s lives to treasure later, but these moments are difficult to anticipate and to capture without disruption. We introduce KidKeeper, a toy-like system to capture, select, and deliver everyday family memories with minimal effort and disruption to family life. In our study, we explore how technologies like KidKeeper mediate and align the different interests and values of various family members, namely parents who want precious moments and children who want to play, towards accomplishing a family goal to capture memories of everyday life.

     

    Teng Ye: "Does Collectivism Inhibit Individual Creativity? The Effects of Collectivism and Perceived Diversity on Individual Creativity and Satisfaction in Virtual Ideation Teams"

    Bio

    Teng Ye is a Ph.D. candidate at the School of Information, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (UMSI). She works with Prof. Lionel P. Robert Jr. She is interested in understanding how to motivate users to participate and how to promote their performance in the virtual context, such as in virtual teams, crowdsourcing and the sharing economy. She received a B.S. in Management Information Systems at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China.

    Abstract

    One particular problem CSCW and HCI scholars have sought to address through the design of collaborative systems is the issues associated with diversity and creativity. Diversity can promote creativity by exposing individuals to different perspectives and at the same time make it difficult for teams to leverage their differences to be more creative. This paper asserts that through the promotion of cooperation, collectivism will help ideation team members overcome the challenges associated with diversity and promote creativity. To examine this assertion, we conducted an experimental study involving 107 individuals in 33 idea-generation teams. Collectivism was promoted through priming. The results confirm our assertion: collectivism created conditions that facilitated creativity when teams were high in perceived diversity. Collectivism also facilitated more satisfaction among teammates by offsetting negative perceptions of diversity. These results offer new insights on collectivism, perceived diversity and creativity.

  • Mon
    20
    Feb
    2017
    4:00 pm - 5:30 pm1014 Tisch Hall, Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Meg Jones from Georgetown University will give a talk, co-sponsored with the STS speaker series, on Feb. 20 (Mon), 4:00pm - 5:30pm in 1014 Tisch Hall. (add to calendar).

    Abstract:

    Should people be able to delete or hide personal digital information? When and why? Who should receive digital redemption, under what circumstances? Digital redemption refers to the willingness and means to transform digital public information into private information upon a subject’s request, liberating the individual from discoverable personal information. The legal implementation of digital redemption – the right to be forgotten – is about legally addressing digital information that lingers and threatens to shackle individuals to their past by exposing the information to opaque data processing and online judgment. Developing any right to be forgotten tasks publics and policymakers with sorting through an extraordinary number of circumstances that place many values at stake as controversial issues arise. The three points sorted through in this talk are: 1) that privacy may need to be retroactive – we may not be able to talk about whether someone chose to share something as the crux of a privacy determination; 2) that permanence is a dangerous idea – and when we’re talking about ICTs, always wrong; 3) and that in tackling this vast environment of scenarios and longevity, different legal cultures are coming up with different,  sometimes conflicting, responses that challenge the global web.

     

  • Tue
    10
    Jan
    2017
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 2435 (Space 2435), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Sangseok You from the School of Information will be giving a practice job talk on Jan. 10 (Tues), noon-1PM in Space 2435 on methods to increase performance and viability in teams working with robots.

    Light lunch will be provided, please let us know if you will be there (so that we know how much food to prepare!).

    (add to calendar).

    Abstract:

    Robots are increasingly being adopted many types of teams. Unlike other technologies such as group support systems, database systems, and word processors, robots can be unique due to its physical embodiment. Inclusion and interaction with robots can reshape teamwork, which warrants investigations on how teams working with robots promote their performance and facilitate good relationships within teams. In this talk, I will describe my work on examining a few ways to increase performance and viability in teams working with robots. The talk involves a study of emotional attachment to robots that increase team outcomes as the main portion, along with a brief overview of my research agenda that has been developed through years of my Ph.D. study. In the emotional attachment study, I will report results from a lab-experiment with 57 teams working with robots that consisted of two humans and two robots. When performing a collaborative team task, teams that built their robots and perceived team identification felt higher emotional attachment, which resulted in better team performance and viability. My work demonstrates that emotional bonds to the physically embodied artifact can benefit team outcomes, and the benefit requires unique approaches to foster in the context of teams working with robots. I will detail the study and implications for future of teamwork with robots.

     

    Bio:

    Sangseok You is a Ph.D. candidate in information at the University of Michigan School of Information (UMSI), advised by Lionel Robert. His research lies at the intersection of information systems, teams, and human-computer interaction with a focus on understanding how teams working with robot operate and promote the effectiveness of teamwork. He received BBA in Business Administration in 2009 and MS in Human-computer interaction in 2012 from Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea.

  • Tue
    06
    Dec
    2016
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Jenny Radesky from the Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics here at the University of Michigan Medical School will give a MISC talk on Dec. 6 (Tues), noon-1PM in NQ 3100. She will discuss her work on parent and young child mobile device use.

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP by 12pm on Sun. (12/4), so that we can get a head count.

    (add to calendar).

    Abstract:

    TBA

     

    Bio:

    Dr. Radesky is an Assistant Professor in Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics at the University of Michigan Medical School.  She received her M.D. from Harvard Medical School, trained in pediatrics at Seattle Children’s Hospital, and completed fellowship training in developmental behavioral pediatrics at Boston Medical Center.  Her research interests include use of mobile technology by parents and young children and how this relates to child self-regulation, parent mental health, and parent-child interaction.  Clinically, her work focuses on developmental and behavioral problems in low-income and underserved populations, family advocacy, parent-child relationship difficulties, and autism spectrum disorder.  She was lead author of the 2016 American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement on digital media use in early childhood.

    Twitter: @jennyradesky

  • Tue
    22
    Nov
    2016
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Lauren Wilcox from the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Institute of Technology will give a MISC talk on Nov. 22 (Tues), noon-1PM in NQ 3100. She will discuss her work on  facilitating personal health-related information awareness and understanding through effective design and use of technology.

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP by 12pm on Sun. (11/20), so that we can get a head count.

    (add to calendar).

    Abstract:

    The recent trend toward patient participation in their own healthcare has opened up numerous challenges and opportunities for computing research. My research focuses on how technology can be designed to foster this participation---in particular, how user interfaces can be designed and developed to facilitate health-related information awareness and understanding. In this talk, I will provide an overview of my work at Georgia Tech to facilitate personal health-related information awareness and understanding through effective design and use of technology.  I will report on formative studies with collaborators at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA) focused on designing technology for a critical yet under-supported group: teens with chronic illnesses. Finally, I will discuss projects in the emerging area of consumer health informatics, that demonstrate the feasibility of aiding college students in better understanding their personal health behaviors. I will conclude by describing a future in which transformative interventions will better support communication of multi-faceted health-related information to a variety of end users.

     

    Bio:

    Dr. Lauren Wilcox is an assistant professor in the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Institute of Technology where she directs the Health Experience and Applications Lab (Hx Lab). Her research focuses on designing, building, and evaluating technology to support the needs of people working both individually and together to achieve health-related goals. Lauren received her PhD in Computer Science from Columbia University in 2013. Her studies related to communicating patient-centered health information have been recognized by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) through a Dissertation Award in 2012 and by the NSF through a CISE Research Initiation Initiative award in 2015. Prior to her academic career, Lauren worked as a Software Engineer at IBM, where she was recognized with an Early Tenure Inventor award. She served on the technical program committee for ACM CHI 2016 and PervasiveHealth 2016 and serves on the scientific program committee for the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA).

  • Tue
    15
    Nov
    2016
    12:00pm-1:00pmEhrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

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    Timothy A. Pletcher from the Department of Learning Health Sciences here at University of Michigan and Executive Director of the Michigan Health Information Network Shared Services (MiHIN), will give a MISC talk, “MiHIN Use Case Factory: Michigan’s mass data sharing approach,” on Nov. 15 (Tues), noon-1PM in NQ 3100.

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis.

     

     

    Bio:

    Dr. Tim Pletcher is the Executive Director of the Michigan Health Information Network Shared Services (MiHIN), a public and private nonprofit collaboration dedicated to improving the healthcare experience, improving quality and decreasing cost for Michigan’s people by making valuable data available at the point of care through statewide health information sharing. Dr. Pletcher is also an Adjunct Research Investigator of Learning Health Sciences at the University of Michigan Medical School.

    Previously he was the founding director for the Institute for Health and Business Insight at Central Michigan University (CMU) that provided high-end data science services to Fortune 500 companies and large organizations to extract insight and value from their data using business intelligence and predictive modeling.  Some clients included Dow Chemical, General Motors, Harley Davidson, Henry Ford Health System, Partners Health, Eli Lilly, Procter & Gamble, and Steelcase. Prior to joining CMU Tim was the Chief Technology Officer at a start-up corporation funded by Oracle and PSI Net that specialized in electronic commerce and customized supply chain automation.

    Tim started his career in the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering where he built advanced data networks, and was later recruited to the Medical Center to develop the Health Sciences Network. Subsequently at the Consortium for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) Tim worked in Washington D.C. on the NASA EOS-DIS project supporting a Federal Inter-Agency Working Group on Data Management for Global Change Networking Activity and the Centers for Disease Control, United Nations, World Bank, and World Health Organization.

    After returning to the University of Michigan from Washington D.C., Tim led an advanced technology group and served as the Director for Research and Business Information Systems at the University of Michigan Health System (UMHS) where he managed a team of 48 full-time staff, the production financial systems, and medical billing, and executed a number of multi-million dollar reengineering projects such as mainframe upgrades, conversion to a single patient statement, workflow automation, electronic data interchange, charge capture, and enterprise application integration (HL7). His advanced technology group focused on linking research to clinical practice for efforts like tele-health and simulation. In 2000, Tim and the Medical Readiness Trainer Project team members at UMHS received a Smithsonian-Computer World Medal for utilizing virtual reality and computer based modeling and human patient simulation to reduce medical errors.

    Tim frequently presents both regionally and nationally on topics such as Health Informatics, Advanced Analytics, Data Science, and the requirements for creating a Learning Health System. He received a Doctorate of Health Administration and a Master’s Degree in Health Administration from Central Michigan University, and received his Bachelors of Science from the University of Michigan

  • Tue
    08
    Nov
    2016
    12:00pm-1:00pmEhrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

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    Sun Young Park from the Stamps School of Art and Design and the School of Information here at University of Michigan, will give a MISC talk on Nov. 8 (Tues), noon-1PM in NQ 3100. She will discuss her work on investigating design space for patient-centric technologies to address patient needs and facilitate their information work in medical settings.

    Everyone is welcome  (Add to calendar)-- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP by 12 pm on Sun. (11/6), so that we can get a head count.

     

    Abstract:

    Nearly all IT systems are imperfect at the time of deployment. It often takes time for users to gradually learn and adapt to the new technology through everyday use. This is especially true for IT systems situated in complex environments, such as the healthcare domain. In a typical medical environment, information is constantly changing, and patient care tasks often require close collaboration among multiple clinicians, or even multiple care teams. These challenges dramatically escalate the difficulty of designing effective health IT systems. It also makes the study of users’ technological adaptation behavior a particularly important research area to explore, as this behavior directly informs opportunities for improvement through redesign.

    In this talk, I will present a study that investigates users’ adaptation behavior and the subsequent redesign practice through an in-depth ethnographic study on the implementation of a hospital-wide Electronic Health Records (EHR) system. The results of the study reveal the details of healthcare providers’ adaptation experience, shedding light on how a newly deployed EHR system directly and indirectly alters clinical work practices, and on how individual clinicians respond to the alterations introduced by use of the EHR. In addition, the results of the study point to a need for redesigning HIT systems to engage patients, who have not been sufficiently considered and involved in the current system design. Following the presentation of this study, I will introduce my ongoing research that investigates the design space for patient-centric technologies to address patient needs and facilitate their information work in medical settings. This talk will conclude with broader implications for evaluating and designing a socio-technical system in complex, time-critical, and information-rich contexts, focusing on the role of HCI/design researchers in this emerging design space.

    Bio:

    Sun Young Park is an Assistant Professor in the Stamps School of Art and Design and the School of Information at the University of Michigan. Her research lies at the intersection of Health Informatics, HCI, and CSCW. In particular, her research focuses on designing and evaluating interactive systems to better support clinical collaboration, patient–provider interactions and patients’ health information management. Her work was included in the Best Paper Selection of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) Yearbook of Medical Informatics (2013), and was nominated as a finalist for the Diana E. Forsythe Award for the best publication at the intersection of informatics and social sciences (2013). Prior to her faculty career at UM, Sun Young received a PhD degree in the Department of Informatics at the University of California, Irvine. She received a Master of Design in Interaction Design degree at Carnegie Mellon University, and a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Design (major) and Multi-Media Design (minor) degree at Ewha Women’s University, Seoul, Korea.

    http://www-personal.umich.edu/~sunypark/

  • Fri
    04
    Nov
    2016
    11:30am-1:00pm1255 North Quad, 105 S. State St., Ann Arbor, MI

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    Ben Shneiderman from University of Maryland will be giving a Yahoo-sponsored talk, "The ABCs of Research," on November 4th (Friday), 11:30-1:00pm in ROOM CHANGE: 1255 North Quad. This talk will guide students, faculty, business leaders, and government policy makers on how to produce high-impact research. Teamwork becomes an even more valuable approach since it facilitates the blending of research methods (SED Principle: Blend Science, Engineering and Design Thinking).  He argues it’s time to replace Vannevar Bush’s dated (1945) linear model with new guiding principles to shift the way that governments fund research, universities train students, researchers conduct projects (teams, partnerships), and organizations reward/recognize outcomes.

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served.

     

    Abstract:
    Solving the immense problems of the 21st century will require devoted research teams with passionate leaders who are skilled at nurturing individuals, weaving networks, and cultivating communities. The growing evidence shows that research teams with raised ambitions to find practical solutions and seek foundational theories simultaneously have a greater chance of achieving both (ABC Principle: Applied & Basic Combined).
    This talk will guide students, faculty, business leaders, and government policy makers on how to produce high-impact research. Teamwork becomes an even more valuable approach since it facilitates the blending of research methods (SED Principle: Blend Science, Engineering and Design Thinking).  It’s time to replace Vannevar Bush’s dated (1945) linear model with new guiding principles to shift the way that governments fund research, universities train students, researchers conduct projects (teams, partnerships), and organizations reward/recognize outcomes.

    Bio:
    Ben Shneiderman is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Computer Science, Founding Director (1983-2000) of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory, and a Member of the UM Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS) at the University of Maryland. He is a Fellow of the AAAS, ACM, IEEE, and NAI, and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, in recognition of his pioneering contributions to human-computer interaction and information visualization. His contributions include the direct manipulation concept, clickable highlighted web-links, touchscreen keyboards, dynamic query sliders for Spotfire, development of treemaps, novel network visualizations for NodeXL, and temporal event sequence analysis for electronic health records.

    Shneiderman is the co-author with Catherine Plaisant of Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction (6th ed., 2016). With Stu Card and Jock Mackinlay, he co-authored Readings in Information Visualization: Using Vision to Think (1999). His book Leonardo’s Laptop (MIT Press) won the IEEE book award for Distinguished Literary Contribution. He co-authored Analyzing Social Media Networks with NodeXL with Derek Hansen and Marc Smith. Shneiderman’s latest book is The New ABCs of Research: Achieving Breakthrough Collaborations (Oxford, February 2016).
  • Wed
    02
    Nov
    2016
    12:30pm-1:30pmSpace 2435, 2435 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

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    Beth Mynatt from Georgia Tech’s Institute for People and Technology and Everyday Computing Lab will be giving a MISC talk on November 2nd  (Wed), 12:30 - 1:30pm, in Space 2435 (NQ 2435). In this talk, she will draw from a number of research projects that combine computing research, human-centered design, and health management theory to create promising approaches for promoting wellness, supporting behavior change and delivering improved health outcomes.

    Everyone is welcome  (Add to calendar)-- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP by 12 pm on Sun. (10/30), so that we can get a head count.

    Abstract:

    Healthcare for chronic disease is the dominant cost for many healthcare systems, now and for the foreseeable future. The unique capabilities of pervasive technologies have the potential to transform healthcare practices by shifting care from institutional to home settings, by helping individuals engage in their own care, by facilitating problem solving and observational learning, and by creating a network of communication and collaboration channels that extends healthcare delivery to everyday settings.

    In this talk, Dr. Elizabeth Mynatt will draw from a number of research projects that combine computing research, human-centered design, and health management theory to create promising approaches for promoting wellness, supporting behavior change and delivering improved health outcomes.

    Bio:

    Dr. Elizabeth Mynatt is the Executive Director of Georgia Tech’s Institute for People and Technology (IPaT), a College of Computing Professor, and the Director of the Everyday Computing Lab. She investigates the design and evaluation of health information technologies including creating personalized mobile technology for supporting breast cancer patients during their cancer journey, evaluating mobile sensing and mHealth engagement for pediatric epilepsy patients and their caregivers, and investigating the positive and negative influence of social media on self-harm behaviors such as eating disorders. She is also one of the principal researchers in the Aware Home Research Initiative; investigating the design of future home technologies, especially those that enable older adults to continue living independently as opposed to moving to an institutional care setting.

    Mynatt is also the Chair of the Computing Community Consortium, an NSF-sponsored effort to engage the computing research community in envisioning more audacious research challenges. She serves as member of the National Academies Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) and as an ACM Council Member at Large. She has been recognized as an ACM Fellow, a member of the SIGCHI Academy, and a Sloan and Kavli research fellow. She has published more than 100 scientific papers and chaired the CHI 2010 conference, the premier international conference in human-computer interaction. Prior to joining the Georgia Tech faculty in 1998, Mynatt was a member of the research staff at Xerox PARC, working with the founder of ubiquitous computing, Mark Weiser.

  • Tue
    25
    Oct
    2016
    12:00pm-1:00pmEhrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    DoIIIT_showcase

    This coming Tuesday (10/25 @ noon, NQ 3100), DoIIIT, in partnership with MISC, will host a showcase of Critical Making Projects created by participants of their recent “Critical Making: Wearable Technology and Body Politics” workshop, held October 17-18 over fall break.

    There will be a brief recap of the workshop, and researchers and students who participated in the workshop will give a lightning talk and demo of their work, followed by a time for Q&A and discussion

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! (Add to calendar) Light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis. RSVP here  by noon of the coming Sunday, 10/23.

     

     

  • Tue
    11
    Oct
    2016
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Please RSVP by noon of Sunday, 10/9. Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis. (add to calendar).

     

    Shiqing(Licia) He

    Abstract:

    VIZITCARDS is a card-driven workshop developed for our graduate infovis class. The workshop is intended to provide practice with good design techniques and to simultaneously reinforce key concepts. VIZITCARDS relies on principles of collaborative-learning and research on parallel design to generate positive collaborations and high-quality designs. From our experience of simulating a realistic design scenario in a classroom setting, we find that our students were able to meet key learning objectives and their design performance improved during the class. In this presentation, we describe variants of the workshop, discussing which techniques we think match to which learning goals.

    Bio:

    Shiqing(Licia) He is a PhD student at the UMSI. She is currently working with Prof. Eytan Adar. While focusing on information visualization research, Licia is also conducting projects and researches in design, game, and generative art. She hopes to find ways to merge traditional art with technology.

    Xin Rong

    Abstract:

    We present a novel programming IDE driven by a neural network embedding model. In the IDE, the end-users describe their goal in natural language, and the system proposes code solutions, or locates the part of the existing code that needs modification. The IDE includes a novel user interface, called nested-layer spotlight search, which allows rapid navigation of complex APIs. The backend is supported by a bimodal embedding network that jointly models natural language and programming language. The model is trained on data extracted from Stack Overflow, Github, programming textbooks, and various other online resources. Through lab and simulation studies, we demonstrate the utility and the accuracy of the system, especially in the context of supporting data scientists in creating visualizations. This is a practice talk for the upcoming UIST '16 conference in Tokyo, Japan.

    Bio:

    Xin Rong is a doctoral candidate at the University of Michigan, School of Information. His advisor is Professor Eytan Adar. His research focuses on creating and evaluating intelligent systems that support task completion for end users and programmers driven by data mining and machine learning approaches. He also focuses on building visualization systems for interpreting and diagnosing deep neural networks. He received his Bachelor degree in automation from Tsinghua University in 2011, and has had internships at Baidu, Google, and Microsoft Research. He is expected to graduate in 2017 and is currently on the job market.

  • Tue
    04
    Oct
    2016
    12:00pm-01:00pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

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    Everyone is welcome -  light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP, so that we will be prepared (add to calendar).

    Abstract:

    More than a decade before Facebook launched, body modification enthusiasts were running their own social media platform, drawing users interested in piercings, tattoos and other modifications. In New Jersey’s longstanding punk scene, music enthusiasts have honed methods for simultaneously publicizing shows and evading police, using a range of technologies, some far older than many of the scene’s participants. Brooklyn’s booming drag community has revitalized New York’s drag culture, bringing an assortment of hacks and workarounds for crafting drag personas online. Drawing on years of mixed methods field work, including ethnography, focus groups and archival textual analysis, this talk examines the capacity of digital technologies to support countercultural communities, with the goal of exposing the multi-faceted nature of online life and to expose wider implications of how internet technologies are reshaping social interactions.

    Bio:

    Jessa Lingel is an assistant professor at the Annenberg School of Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to that, she was a post doctoral research fellow at Microsoft Research New England, working with the Social Media Collective. She received her Ph.D. in communication and information from Rutgers University. She has an MLIS from Pratt Institute and an M.A. from New York University. Her research interests include information inequalities and technological distributions of power.

     

     

  • Tue
    27
    Sep
    2016
    12:00pm-01:00pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

     

     

     

     

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP, so that we will be prepared (add to calendar).

    MISC will kick off the year with a series of lightning talks from our four new faculty at UMSI. Matthew Kay, Michael Nebeling, Steve Oney, and Florian Schaub will be giving brief introductions of their research, followed by Q & A and discussion.

  • Tue
    17
    May
    2016
    12:00pm-01:00pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

    MISC Talk Martez Mott

     

     

     

     

     

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP, so that we will be prepared (add to calendar).

    Improving Touch Interaction for People with Motor Impairments through Ability-Based Design

    Bio:

    Martez Mott is a fourth year Ph.D. candidate in the Information School at the University of Washington. He is a member of the Mobile + Accessible Design Lab (MAD Lab) where he is advised by Jacob O. Wobbrock. Martez’s research takes an ability-based approach toward improving the accessibility of touch-enabled devices for people with motor impairments and for people under the effects of situational impairments. He received a Best Paper Award at the 2016 ACM Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (CHI) for his work on touch screen accessibility for people with motor impairments.

    Abstract:

    Touch is one of the most dominant ways users interact with modern computing devices, such as smartphones, tablets, and public kiosks. For people with motor impairments, however, the implicit ability-assumptions embedded in the design of touch screens makes touch-enabled devices inoperable for many users. In this talk, I will describe how my collaborators and I took an ability-based design approach to touch screen accessibility by making touch screens more amenable to a wider-range of users’ touch abilities. First, I will describe results from an exploratory study of the touch behaviors of 10 people with motor impairments. In our study, we discovered that touching with the backs or sides of the hand, with multiple fingers, or with knuckles created varied multi-point touches, even when only a single touch-point is intended. Second, I will describe Smart Touch, a novel template matching technique that maps any number of arbitrary touch areas to a user’s intended (x,y) target location. In an experiment, we discovered that Smart Touch was able to predict target locations over three times closer to users’ intended targets compared to the de facto Land-on and Lift-off locations reported by the native sensors in the Microsoft PixelSense interactive table. Finally, I will preview some of our upcoming work on improving touch on mobile devices for people with motor impairments, and for people under the effects of situational impairments (e.g., while walking).

     

  • Tue
    03
    May
    2016
    12:00 pm - 1:00 pmNQ 2245, North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

    Yan Chen and Xuan Zhao

     

     

     

     

     

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP, so that we will be prepared (add to calendar).

    Yan Chen: Towards Providing On-Demand Expert Support for Software Developers

    Bio:

    Yan is a 2nd year PhD student at the UMSI. He is currently working with Dr. Walter S. Lasecki and Dr. Steve Oney to build expert crowd-powered systems to support human complex tasks. He is current looking at how to develop systems to better support software development such that developers can request on-demand help given by domain experts. He also starts to look at online freelance marketplace, and attempts to better understand the existing challenges of recruitment and information delivery.

    Abstract:

    Software development is an expert task that requires complex reasoning and the ability to recall language or API-specific details. In practice, developers often seek support from IDE tools, Web resources, or other developers to help fill in gaps in their knowledge on-demand. In this paper, we present two studies that seek to inform the design of future systems that use remote experts to support developers on demand. The first explores what types of questions developers would ask a hypothetical assistant capable of answering any question they pose. The second study explores the interactions between developers and remote “experts” in supporting roles. Our results suggest eight key system features needed for on-demand remote developer assistants to be effective, which has implications for future human-powered development tools.

     

    Xuan Zhao: The Social Media Ecology: User Perceptions, Strategies and Challenge

    Bio:

    Xuan Zhao's research investigates how users and systems work together in curating and exhibiting personal digital data (especially in social media), and how to design for technology-mediated reflection for both self and close relationships, as a way to support long-term interaction between users and their data. Before joining UMSI, Xuan got her Master's degree in Communication from Cornell University and and worked closely with Reimagination Lab. She has also worked at Facebook UEX Research, the Intelligent Collaboration group at IBM Research (China), and the Human Experience and Design group at Microsoft Research Cambridge.

    Abstract:

    Many existing studies of social media focus on only one platform, but the reality of users’ lived experiences is that most users incorporate multiple platforms into their communication practices in order to access the people and networks they desire to influence. In order to better understand how people make sharing decisions across multiple sites, we asked our participants (N=29) to categorize all modes of communication they used, with the goal of surfacing their mental models about managing sharing across platforms. Our interview data suggest that people simultaneously consider “audience” and “content” when sharing and these needs sometimes compete with one another; that they have the strong desire to both maintain boundaries between platforms as well as allowing content and audience to permeate across these boundaries; and that they strive to stabilize their own communication ecosystem yet need to respond to changes necessitated by the emergence of new tools, practices, and contacts. We unpack the implications of these tensions and suggest future design possibilities.

  • Fri
    29
    Apr
    2016
    10:00 am - 02:00 pmNQ 2255, North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

    source

    The annual MISC retreat will feature a keynote by Robert Goodspeed from U-M’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning as well as a reflection on the last year of MISC and a planning session for the next year. People are encouraged to bring questions and ideas. There will be lunch and coffee for people to mingle and relax after exam week. Everyone is welcome to join, but please RSVP, so that we can plan appropriately for lunch.

     

     

    Civic Crowdfunding: Internet Mobilization for Neighborhood Collective Action

    Robert Goodspeed (Taubman)

    Abstract:

    Voluntary collective action to improve neighborhood conditions is an important way communities improve urban quality of life. In recent years, entrepreneurs have created civic crowdfunding websites that enable community organizations to easily collect donations and assemble volunteers for neighborhood initiatives through online outreach that extends beyond in-person social ties. The talk reports the results from an empirical study investigating the characteristics of successful civic crowdfunding projects, and assesses their impact on neighborhood collective action capacity. The research draws on Davis’ (1991) theory of neighborhood collective action, and Heylighen, Kostov, and Kiemen’s (2013) concept of mobilization systems to investigate two questions: 1) Which characteristics of neighborhoods, organizations, project leaders/sponsors and mobilization system use are related to collective action (crowdfunding project) success or failure? and 2) Under what conditions, and for which users, does civic crowdfunding improve neighborhood collective action capacity? The paper draws on detailed case studies of 15-20 crowdfunding projects drawn from all projects initiative in 2016 on two popular platforms (ioby and Patronicity) in New York City, Memphis, and Detroit. Preliminary results show that successful projects are able to attract diverse groups of donors, but civic crowdfunding projects only increase collective action capacity when donors are provided opportunities to become further involved. In addition, while civic crowdfunding results in funds and personnel, survey data suggest organizations may be hindered by a lack of collective consciousness required for ongoing activities.

    Bio:

    Robert Goodspeed is an Assistant Professor of Urban Planning at the University of Michigan's Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning. He teaches in the areas of geographic information systems (GIS), collaborative planning, and scenario planning theory and methods. He holds a Ph.D. in urban and regional planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an M.C.P. from the University of Maryland, and a B.A. in history from the University of Michigan. He has been named a Leading Thinker in Urban Planning and Technology by the website Planetizen. Prior to pursuing a Ph.D., Goodspeed worked as a research analyst at the Boston Metropolitan Area Planning Council, and co-founded three award-winning websites, ArborUpdate, DCist, and Rethink College Park.

  • Tue
    26
    Apr
    2016
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

    MISC Talks - Daphne Chang and Chanda Phelan

     

     

     

     

     

    Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis; make sure to RSVP, so that we will be prepared (add to calendar).

    Daphne Chang

    Bio:

    Daphne Chang is a doctoral candidate at UMSI. She draws on methods and concepts from economics and psychology to examine the impact of social influence and personal perception on individuals’ behaviors. Her current projects include the influence of social norms on prosocial behavior, the effect of moods on risky choices, and the impact of nudges on information disclosure.

    Abstract:

    Nudging behaviors through user interface design is a practice that is well-studied in HCI research. Corporations often use this knowledge to modify online interfaces to influence user information disclosure. In this paper, we experimentally test the impact of norm-shaping design patterns on information divulging behavior. We show that (1) a set of images, biased toward more revealing figures, change subjects’ personal views of appropriate information to share; (2) that shifts in perceptions significantly increases the probability that a subject divulges personal information; and (3) that these shift also increases the probability that the subject advises others to do so. Our main contribution is empirically identifying a key mechanism by which norm-shaping designs can change beliefs and subsequent disclosure behaviors.

    Chanda Phelan

    Bio:

    Chanda Phelan is a PhD student in human-computer interaction working with Dr. Paul Resnick at UMSI. Her research focus is designing for underprivileged groups, particularly as related to health behavior change. Her current research projects include a walking program that leverages existing social networks to promote social support and motivation to help users become more active. She is also a Rackham Merit Fellow. She holds a MS in information economics from UMSI and a BA in English from Pomona College.

    Abstract:

    Undergraduates interviewed about privacy concerns related to online data collection made apparently contradictory statements. The same issue could evoke concern or not in the span of an interview, sometimes even a single sentence. Drawing on dual-process theories from psychology, we argue that some of the apparent contradictions can be resolved if privacy concern is divided into two components we call intuitive concern, a “gut feeling,” and considered concern, produced by a weighing of risks and benefits. Consistent with previous explanations of the so-called privacy paradox, we argue that people may express high considered concern when prompted, but in practice act on low intuitive concern without a considered assessment. We also suggest a new explanation: a considered assessment can override an intuitive assessment of high concern without eliminating it. Here, people may choose rationally to accept a privacy risk but still express intuitive concern when prompted.

  • Mon
    18
    Apr
    2016
    12:00 pm - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

    source

     Priyank Chandra

    Bio:

    Priyank Chandra is a doctoral candidate at University of Michigan’s School of Information. His current research is at the intersection of pirate infrastructures, institutions, and technology adoption. He holds a BE in electronics engineering and MS in economics, with prior experience in data analytics and education research.

    Abstract:

    The paper analyzes the warez scene, an illegal underground subculture on the Internet, which specializes in removing copy protection from software and releasing the cracked software for free. Despite the lack of economic incentives and the absence of external laws regulating it, the warez scene has been able to self-govern and self-organize for more than three decades. Through a directed content analysis of the subculture’s digital traces, the paper argues that the ludic competition within the warez scene is an institution of collective action, and can, therefore, be approached as a common-pool resource (CPR).

    Subsequently, the paper uses Ostrom’s framework of longenduring common-pool resource institutions to understand the warez scene’s longevity and ability to govern itself. Theoretical and design implications of these findings are then discussed.

    Lindsay Blackwell

    Bio:

    Lindsay Blackwell is a PhD student in UMSI's Social Media Research Lab. Her research explores misbehavior in online communities, including trolling and online harassment. Prior to graduate school, Lindsay directed award-winning social media campaigns for local and national clients, including I Love New York. Lindsay is also a fellow with the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. You can follow Lindsay on Twitter (@linguangst) or by visiting www.lindsayblackwell.net.

    Abstract:

    Increasing numbers of American parents identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT). Shifting social movements are beginning to achieve greater recognition for LGBT parents and more rights for their families; however, LGBT parents still experience stigma and judgment in a variety of social contexts. We interviewed 28 LGBT parents to investigate how they navigate their online environments in light of these societal shifts. We find that 1) LGBT parents use social media sites to detect disapproval and identify allies within their social networks; 2) LGBT parents become what we call incidental advocates, when everyday social media posts are perceived as advocacy work even when not intended as such; and 3) for LGBT parents, privacy is a complex and collective responsibility, shared with children, partners, and families. We consider the complexities of LGBT parents’ online disclosures in the context of shifting social movements and discuss the importance of supporting individual and collective privacy boundaries in these contexts. Full paper: http://bit.ly/lgbtparents.

    Please RSVP by April. 16 (Sat.) noon. Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis (add to calendar).

  • Tue
    29
    Mar
    2016
    12:00 - 01:00 pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

    source

    Abstract:

    Interaction design (IxD) continues to extend beyond its boundaries by collaborating with more disciplines and by addressing new types of problematic situations. In these cases, interaction designers must envision many new futures that have never existed, a type of work that can often be challenging. It is much too easy to design future technology that should not exists and/or that people will never accept. In response, design researchers and theorists have described both the process and challenge with problem and solution framing as a core part of design.

    Our research group has developed and evolved a design method we call speed dating. The name comes from romantic speed dating, where singles participate in many short dates with a number of potential mates, supported by props such as a tablecloth, candle, and glass of wine. Speed dating as a design method works similarly. A design team brings in a target set of participants, gives them a small taste of possible future designs, and probes them to critically reflect on the future they desire. These sessions often produce a request for a future found outside of the concepts presented, and one that could not have been directly inferred from fieldwork with the target participants.

    Over the last decade, we have evolved this method to address different kinds of problematic situations, varying the level of fidelity and interactivity to aid participants in reflecting on the aspects of the future we wanted to explore. In this talk, I will present the trajectory of our development of the speed dating design method. I will present a number of case studies illustrating how we manipulated fidelity and interactivity, and show how speed dating can result in new and better knowledge about desired futures. Finally, I will highlight the benefits and limitations of this interaction design approach.

    Please RSVP by Mar. 27 (Sun.) noon. Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis (add to calendar).

    Bio:

    Jodi Forlizzi is a Professor of Human-Computer Interaction in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University and a Co-founder of Pratter.us, a healthcare startup. She designs and researches systems ranging from peripheral displays to social and assistive robots. Her current research interests include designing educational games that are engaging and effective, designing services that adapt to people’s needs, and designing for healthcare. Jodi is a member of the ACM CHI Academy and has been honored by the Walter Reed Army Medical Center for excellence in HRI design research. Jodi has consulted with Disney and General Motors to create innovative product-service systems.

  • Tue
    23
    Feb
    2016
    12:00 pm - 1:00 pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor MI 48109

    source

    Abstract:

    “Computing and society” provides no simple binary.  Rapid sociotechnical change and entrepreneurialism are but two of the many topics that arise in addressing that subject.  The issues involve power, infrastructure, and new forms of work (venture labor, flexible work, etc.). What does it mean to be entrepreneurial citizens, self-making risk takers, and “part of the solution” instead of “part of the problem?”  This discussion examines this from an organizational studies perspective.

    In this panel, Prof. Silvia Lindtner and Prof. Casey Pierce will facilitate a discussion with two panelists: Prof. Jerry Davis from the Ross School of Business and Prof. John Leslie King from the School of Information, bringing perspectives from organization studies and information studies to bear on contemporary transformations of work, labor, and organizing.

    Please RSVP by Feb. 21 (Sun.) noon. Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis (add to calendar).

    Panelists:

    Prof. Jerry Davis

    Jerry Davis received his PhD from the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University and taught at Northwestern and Columbia before moving to the University of Michigan, where he is Wilbur K. Pierpont Collegiate Professor of Management and of Sociology.  He has published widely in management, sociology, and finance.  Books include Social Movements and Organization Theory (Cambridge University Press, 2005); Organizations and Organizing (Pearson Prentice Hall, 2007); Managed by the Markets: How Finance Reshaped America (Oxford University Press, 2009); Changing your Company from the Inside Out: A Guide for Social Intrapreneurs (Harvard Business Review Press, 2015); and The Vanishing American Corporation (Berrett Koehler, forthcoming).  He is Editor of the Administrative Science Quarterly and Director of the Interdisciplinary Committee on Organization Studies (ICOS) at the University of Michigan.

    Davis’s research is broadly concerned with the effects of finance on society.  Recent writings examine how ideas about corporate social responsibility have evolved to meet changes in the structures and geographic footprint of multinational corporations; whether "shareholder capitalism" is still a viable model for economic development; how income inequality in an economy is related to corporate size and structure; why theories about organizations do (or do not) progress; how architecture shapes social networks and innovation in organizations; why stock markets spread to some countries and not others; and whether there exist viable organizational alternatives to shareholder-owned corporations in the United States.

     

    Prof. John Leslie King

    John Leslie King is W.W. Bishop Professor of Information, former Dean of the School of Information and former Vice Provost at the University of Michigan. He joined Michigan in 2000 after twenty years on the faculties of computer science and management at the University of California at Irvine.  He has published more than 200 books and papers from his research on the relationship between technical and social change.  He was Marvin Bower Fellow at the Harvard Business School, distinguished visiting professor in Singapore (at both the National University of Singapore and at Nanyang Technological University), and Fulbright Distinguished Chair in American Studies at the University of Frankfurt.  He is currently Visiting Professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science.  He was Editor-in-Chief of the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research, and served as associate editor for other journals.  He has been on the Board of the Computing Research Association (CRA), the Council of the Computing Community Consortium, and the U.S. National Science Foundation Advisory Committees for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE), Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE), and Cyberinfrastructure (ACCI).  His PhD is in administration from the University of California, Irvine.  He received an honorary doctorate in economics from Copenhagen Business School. He is an elected fellow of the Association for Information Systems and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

     

    Prof. Silvia Lindtner

    Silvia Lindtner is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan in the School of Information, with a courtesy appointment in the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design. Lindtner’s research and teaching interests include transnational networks of innovation and entrepreneurship culture, DIY (do it yourself) making and hacking, science and technology studies in China, and Internet and digital cultures. She is currently writing a book on the culture and politics of “making” and transnational entrepreneurship in urban China. Her research has been awarded support from the US National Science Foundation, IMLS, Intel Labs, Google Anita Borg, and the Chinese National Natural Science Foundation. Her work has appeared at ACM SIGCHI, ACM CSCW (Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing), ST&HV (Science Technology & Human Values), Games & Culture, China Information, and other venues. Lindtner is affiliated with several interdisciplinary centers and initiatives on campus including the Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies, the Science, Technology and Society Program and the Michigan Interactive and Social Computing Research Group, and directs the Tech.Culture.Matters. Research Group. Together with Professor Anna Greenspan and David Li, Lindtner co co-directs the China-based Research Initiative Hacked Matter, dedicated to critically investigating processes of technology innovation, urban redesign, and maker-manufacturing cultures in China.

     

    Prof. Casey Pierce

    Casey Pierce is an Assistant Professor in the School of Information at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on how technology influences knowledge sharing, work practices and organizational outcomes. In this line of research, she has examined social media use in organizations, technology implementation during a federal policy change, and how employees work across geographic boundaries. Currently, Casey is studying how physicians and healthcare workers collaborate using online communities and telemedicine platforms. Casey received her BA in Psychology and MA in Communication Management from the University of Southern California and her PhD in Communication from Northwestern University’s Media, Technology, and Society program.

    This presentation was recorded and you can view it here

  • Tue
    09
    Feb
    2016
    12:00pm-1:00pmNQ 3100 (The Ehrlicher Room), North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    Chris, Colleen, and Chuck

    Abstract:
    Two years ago, Georgia Tech began its first online-only master’s degree. Meanwhile, Massive Open Online Courses such as those offered by Coursera, edX, and Udacity have seen tens of millions of course enrollments across the globe. These courses have garnered significant debate and attention in higher education, on the one hand celebrated as disruptive revolution and on the other condemned as a failed experiment innovating and democratizing education. Are online courses a threat to the traditional residential university experience? Do they alleviate inequalities in education, or provide more opportunities to an already educated population? Does pedagogy drive technology, or does technology decide pedagogy?

    In this panel, educational technology researcher (Dr. Christopher Brooks) will facilitate a discussion with two panelists: Dr. Chuck Severance and Dr. Colleen van Lent, who are both popular MOOC instructors. Join us with your questions about online courses, and what they mean for students of higher education.

    Panelists:
    Dr. Christopher Brooks
    Dr. Christopher Brooks is a Research Assistant Professor with the School of Information, and Director of Learning Analytics and Research with the office of Digital Education and Innovation. He studies educational technology and teaching and learning in higher education, and has been involved in research and experimentation looking at how students interact in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). His research focuses on applying data-driven approaches to the analysis of educational technology, including data mining, machine learning, and computational data science.

    Dr. Colleen van Lent
    Colleen van Lent is a Lecturer IV at the University of Michigan School of Information, where she teaches various technology-oriented courses including introductory programming and Web development. Colleen's previous jobs include Associate Professor at California State University and positions at NASA JPL, the Naval Research Lab, and the NSA. She received her BS from Kent State University Honors College in Computer Science, and an MS and PhD from the University of Pittsburgh, also in Computer Science. Her thesis was on Artificial Intelligence applications on the Nursebot Project, a robotic assistant for the elderly. Her honors include being chosen as a National Physical Sciences Consortium Fellow and a NASA Faculty Fellow. Colleen has always emphasized the idea of technology for everybody. To that end she has worked creating courses for education majors to learn robotics, as well other CS curriculum for non-majors. Her current focus is outreach with elementary and middle school students to learn problem-solving, coding, and design. She has published two recent books for children, "Web Design with HTML" and more "Web Design with HTML".

    Dr. Charles R. Severance
    Dr. Charles R. Severance is a Clinical Associate Professor and teaches in the School of Information at the University of Michigan. He is the Chair of the Sakai Project Management Committee (PMC). and works for Longsight, Inc. as Sakai Chief Strategist. Previously he was the Executive Director of the Sakai Foundation and the Chief Architect of the Sakai Project and worked with the IMS Global Learning Consortium promoting and developing standards for teaching and learning technology. Charles teaches two popular MOOCs to students worldwide on the Coursera platform: Internet History, Technology, and Security and Programming for Everybody and is a long-time advocate of open educational resources to empower teachers.

    Please RSVP by Feb. 7 (Sun.) noon. Everyone is welcome -- light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis (add to calendar).

    This presentation was recorded and you can view it here

  • Tue
    26
    Jan
    2016
    12:00pm-1:00pm2435 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    Bio:
    Sophia Brueckner, born in Detroit, MI, is an artist, designer, and engineer. Inseparable from computers since the age of two, she believes she is a cyborg. She received her Sc.B. in Computer Science and Applied Mathematics from Brown University. As a software engineer at Google, she worked on the front-end development and interface design of products used by tens of millions and later on experimental projects within Google Research.

    Brueckner earned her MFA in Digital + Media at the Rhode Island School of Design where she explored the simultaneously empowering and controlling aspects of technology, particularly within user experience design and computer programming, through her artwork. As a researcher at the MIT Media Lab in the Fluid Interfaces Group, she combined the understanding that interfaces structure thought processes with ideas from cognitive behavioral therapy to design and build interactive devices for mental health.

    Brueckner feels an urgency to understand and raise awareness of technology's controlling effects, and to encourage the ethical and thoughtful design of new technologies. To do so, she teaches Science Fiction to Science Fabrication, a course combining science fiction and invention. Since 2011, she taught multiple versions of the class to students and researchers at MIT, Harvard, RISD, and Brown. Both the class itself as well as the students’ individual projects received international recognition and were featured by Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, Studio 360, Scientific American, Fast Company, and many others.

    Brueckner’s work has been exhibited internationally including the Peabody Essex Museum, SIGGRAPH, the Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Leaders in Software and Art Conference in New York. She is especially interested in the application of embodied cognition to interaction design, wearable technology, digital fabrication, generative systems, sound, and, as a technology antidote, painting. She recently joined the University of Michigan's Stamps School of Art and Design as an assistant professor. Her ongoing objective is to meaningfully combine her background in interaction design and engineering with the perspective of an artist to create new technologies in the service of mental and physical well-being.

  • Thu
    10
    Dec
    2015
    9:00am-10:30amVideo Viewing Room, Language Resource Center 1500 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    Abstract:
    PaGamO, a game designed for engaging online learners in Coursera, won the Overall Award of the Wharton-QS “Reimagine Education” because of its innovative use of gamification. Further, in response to the need of K-12 learners, more features have been developed, and the collaboration with textbook publishers is underway. The renowned platform is developed by the team led by Prof. Ping-Cheng (Benson) Yeh, a U-M alumnus, making a positive impact on educational innovation. In this talk, Prof. Yeh will share with us his work and experience in gamification for education, and also his extensive experience of collaborating with school teachers.

    Bio:
    Prof. Ping-Cheng (Benson) Yeh is a professor in the Department of Electronic Engineering and also the MOOC program director at the National Taiwan University (NTU) with a great passion for teaching. He is one of the world’s leading innovators in modern education and e-learning and he has pioneered many educational experiments and designs:
    - He is the first to win the Overall Award and E-Learning Award in "Wharton-QS 2014 Stars Awards: Reimagine Education", the "Oscars” of innovations in higher education.
    - He is the first in the world to design an MOOC-based multi-student social game to enhance the learning experience of thousands of students on Coursera.
    - He is the first to design a serious game with multi-student social features that can be applied to any courses, used by UPenn. and other universities.
    - He has set the record in Taiwan of more than 2,200 teachers participating in one talk.

  • Tue
    08
    Dec
    2015
    12:00pm-1:00pmEhrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    What happens to our accounts, data, and digital identities after we die? Jed Brubaker is an Assistant Professor and founding member of the department of Information Science at the University of Colorado Boulder. He conducts research in social informatics, social media, and infrastructure studies focusing on how identity is designed, represented, and experienced in socio-technical systems. During this talk, he will discuss what death tells us about the technological design of identity, how identity infrastructure shapes the ways the user is operationalized, and the importance of future research that accounts for the infrastructure that undergirds user-centered research and practice.

  • Tue
    17
    Nov
    2015
    12:00pm-1:00pm2435 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    Abstract:
    Building on intersections between science and technology studies and design, this presentation explores several modes of theorizing making and making theory through the creation of and engagement with socio-technical artifacts. The first mode, about technology, discusses participatory and speculative practices related to a workshop on the future of work. The second mode, with technology, engages in digital design and fabrication from a project on computational fashion. The third mode, becoming technology, uses autobiographical design to reflect on disability and medical devices from the perspective of feminist (un)hacking. This presentation reflects on the aesthetics and cosmopolitics of these varied design practices as ways of inquiring about the world, building knowledge and prototyping alternative possible futures that embed values, ethics and responsibilities. These accounts serve to reconfigure traditional understandings of human-centered design and human-computer interaction towards practices that open up spaces for a deeper consideration of the importance of the role of the non-human in emergent design practices.

    Bio:
    Forlano is an Assistant Professor of Design at the Institute of Design and Affiliated Faculty in the College of Architecture at Illinois Institute of Technology where she is Director of the Critical Futures Lab. From 2012-2013, she was a Visiting Scholar in the Comparative Media Studies program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research is focused on the intersection between emerging technologies, material practices and the future of cities. She is co-editor with Marcus Foth, Christine Satchell and Martin Gibbs of From Social Butterfly to Engaged Citizen: Urban Informatics, Social Media, Ubiquitous Computing, and Mobile Technology to Support Citizen Engagement (MIT Press 2011). Forlano’s research and writing has been published in peer-reviewed journals including Design Issues, the Journal of Peer Production, Fibreculture, Digital Culture & Society, ADA, Journal of Urban Technology, First Monday, The Information Society, Journal of Community Informatics, IEEE Pervasive Computing and Science and Public Policy. She has published chapters for books including editor Mark Shepard’s Sentient City: Ubiquitous Computing, Architecture, and the Future of Urban Space (MIT Press 2011) and The Architecture League of New York’s Situated Technologies pamphlet series and is a regular contributor to their Urban Omnibus blog. She received her Ph.D. in communications from Columbia University.

    This presentation was recorded and you can view it here

  • Fri
    13
    Nov
    2015
    12:00pm-1:00pm2435 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    This coming Friday (11/13 @ noon, NQ 2255), SOCHI, in partnership with MISC, will host student teams to present their project milestone for the CHI 2016 student design competition. Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! (Add to calendar) Light lunch will be served on a first-come-first-served basis.

    The teams are seeking feedback -- hope you can attend!

  • Tue
    10
    Nov
    2015
    12:00pm-1:00pm2435 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    Abstract:
    Card, Moran, & Newell’s seminal 1983 work, The Psychology of Human-Computer Interaction, coincided with the emergence of the HCI field. They proposed assessing usability through models of human performance based on psychological science. This concept, known as “engineering models” for usability, underwent extensive development in the subsequent decades, but it has not been widely adopted by user interface developers. In this talk, I’ll briefly summarize the concept and its scientific development, and suggest where it has much to contribute, and speculate on why it is not widely adopted.

    Bio:
    David Kieras is a Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of Michigan, with a joint appointment in the Department of Psychology. He conducts research in the area of applied and theoretical cognitive psychology, with specific interests in human-computer interaction, cognitive simulation modeling, human performance, complex human learning, and natural language processing. Among the HCI research community, he is well known for Cognitive Complexity Theory, the GOMS model, and EPIC cognitive architecture. For his seminal contributions, he was inducted into the CHI Academy, which honors individuals who have made extensive contributions to the study of HCI and who have led the shaping of the field.

  • Tue
    03
    Nov
    2015
    12:00pm-1:00pm2435 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    Abstract:
    Many of the important themes that have sustained CSCW field-based research for the last 25 years are largely tapped out. To be sure, there are still great studies, such as those that will be at CSCW'16. Yet, we have seen many papers on awareness, online norms, and so on. There are those who feel that the CSCW work studies and other interpretivist research streams are in decline; many interpretivist studies are small incremental elaborations over previous studies or studies that elaborate known findings in new subject domains (such as medicine or education).

    In this talk, I want to consider some ways to revitalize the CSCW interpretivist research agenda. Many efforts are already ongoing in the CSCW community.

    To do this, I will use symbolic interactionist (SI) theory as a case study of sorts to guide the discussion, as recent theoretical developments have moved to update "classic" SI (which would correspond to, roughly, updating the so-called second Chicago School) with the postmodern and practice turns. I find the moves in this update important; they generalize to CSCW socio-technical considerations as well. I also consider why extending a standard CSCW micro-sociological basis it is likely to be valuable to CSCW interpretivist work by expanding previous understandings and opening up new questions.

    This work is joint with Liz Kaziunas and Melissa Chalmers

    Bio:
    Mark Ackerman is the George Herbert Mead Collegiate Professor of Human-Computer Interaction and a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and in the School of Information at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His major research area is Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), primarily Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). He has published widely in HCI and CSCW, investigating collaborative information access in online knowledge communities, medical settings, expertise sharing, and most recently, pervasive environments. Mark is a member of the CHI Academy (HCI Fellow) and an ACM Fellow.

    Previously, Mark was a faculty member at the University of California, Irvine, and a research scientist at MIT's Laboratory for Computer Science (now CSAIL). Before becoming an academic, Mark led the development of the first home banking system, had three Billboard Top-10 games for the Atari 2600, and worked on the X Window System's first user-interface widget set. Mark has degrees from the University of Chicago, Ohio State, and MIT.

    This presentation was recorded and you can view it here

  • Tue
    06
    Oct
    2015
    12:00pm-1:00pmEhrlicher Room, 3100 North Quad, 105 S. State St.

    Abstract:
    News consumers can engage in such self-imposed ideological segregation that it invites partisan differences in perceptions of reality. With the proliferation of digital platforms and mobile communication, people are given increasing opportunity to limit their information exposure to attitudes and opinions that reinforce, rather than challenge, their preexisting beliefs. Whithervanes is a public platform that will connect ambient digital information submitted from all over the planet in real time to physical manifestations of that data. This challenging endeavor is designed to create a global network that draws attention to the role that data is playing in reshaping the world around us. In phase 1 of the project five 21st Century weathervanes (in the form of headless chickens) were controlled by the climate of fear on the Internet. They were presented on five buildings during the 2014 Folkestone Triennial from 30 August – 2 November 2014. Phase 2 will see this project develop from a project to an open software and hardware platform. Whithervanes seeks to impact the sociotechnical imaginary between what the news media tells us, and our capacity to imagine and produce collective visions of desirable futures.

    Bio:
    John Marshall’s creative and scholarly work is design research that results in both interactive installations and publications. Marshall’s studio practice involves a recursive process where multiple stakeholders work together to realize shared goals. Since 1998, Marshall has co-directed rootoftwo, LLC - a hybrid design studio. Marshall is also a partner in r+d LAB, LLC. Recent projects have been featured in Wired, FastCompany, Dezeen, Dwell, Studio International and The Guardian. In 2015 r+d LAB, LLC was selected by Midtown Detroit, Inc. and the New Economy Initiative to transform the undersides of two viaducts located in Midtown Detroit’s TechTown district with an interactive light installation. Marshall is an Associate Professor at the Stamps School of Art & Design; an Associate Professor at the Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning; and Director of the Stamps MDes Integrative Design program at the University of Michigan.