Events

  • Tue
    21
    Nov
    2017
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (11/21 @ 11:30 AM. ​North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Jen Romano Bergstrom from Facebook will give a talk titled Out of the Lab and Into the Field to Understand Users’ Perceptions of Privacy.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. PleaseRSVP by 12PM on 11/19 if you will be there​: https://goo.gl/forms/ejYtWcaLIpJgOEma2

     

    Speaker Bio:

     

    Jen Romano-Bergstrom, Experimental Psychologist; UX Research Lead, Facebook/Instagram; President, UXPA International. Jen has over 12 years of experience planning, conducting and managing user-centered research projects. She is currently a UX Researcher at Facebook/Instagram, where she works to understand the UX of Facebook and Instagram in emerging markets. Jen specializes in efficient applications of empirical methods to ensure quality is not lost while working fast to get actionable results. In addition to being a skilled UX researcher and practitioner, Jen specializes in eye tracking, survey design, experimental design, and cognitive aging. Jen frequently presents research and novel methods at academic and industry conferences, and she publishes in peer-reviewed journals, magazines and blogs. She is co-author of Usability Testing for Survey Research (2017) and co-author/editor of Eye Tracking in User Experience Design (2014). She has served on User Experience Professionals Association (UXPA) boards for several years – currently as the President of the International UXPA, and previously Director of Marketing and Communications, as well as President, Vice President, and Conference Chair for UXPA-DC. Jen received a Ph.D. and M.A. in Applied/Experimental Psychology from The Catholic University of America and a B.A. in Psychology from Central Connecticut State University

    Abstract:

     

    Many user experience (UX) researchers and market researchers conduct research in the lab. We conduct interviews and focus groups to understand our users’ opinions and thoughts, and we watch people interact with products to learn about obstacles to completing tasks. We measure subjective data, such as how people report they feel when interacting with a product; we measure observational data, such as time to complete tasks and errors people make; and we measure implicit data, such as where people look and galvanic skin response while people complete tasks. While lab-based studies are well-controlled and can inform product development greatly, we tend to lack a true understanding of how people use the products. To do this, we must go to the users, in their natural environment. In this talk, I will discuss methods we use at Facebook and Instagram to understand users’ perceptions of privacy and privacy settings. I will discuss pros and cons to various research methodologies and share examples from several international markets. While in-the-field methods have the possibility to introduce bias, they provide a rich understanding of the issues people have using products that we simply cannot know from lab-based studies.

     

    Please join us for this talk on 11/21 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    28
    Nov
    2017
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (11/28 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Astrid Weber from Google will give a talk titled Access Denied. Redesigning the digital information offerings for refugees arriving on the European continent.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 11/26 if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/UOS7WxnvO0glsFmQ2

     

    Speaker Bio:

     

    Astrid Weber is a UX Research Manager at Google's headquarters in California. She leads the Youtube Rapid Research team which conducts research on all aspects of the user-facing parts of the platform. Astrid has a Master's degree in Communication Sciences and Design from the University of the Arts in Berlin and a Bachelor of Arts from the Art Institute of Chicago. Her research focuses on accessibility, emerging markets and technology in the context of migration.

     

    Abstract:

     

    In spring 2017 a team of volunteers partnered up with Google.org and the International Rescue Committee to rethink their online information offering for refugees who come to Europe to seek asylum. The goal of the project was to apply human centered design processes to an unstable information environment. Working out of refugee camps in in Athens, Greece and Belgrade, Serbia, the team built learning resources to help designers understand people's' backgrounds, introduce them to their current situations, and future opportunities. In this talk Astrid Weber discusses the ways in which empathy and immersive learning were valuable in redesigning an app to support some of the most marginalized user groups in the world.

     

    Please join us for this talk on 11/28 @ 11:30 AM

  • Tue
    05
    Dec
    2017
    11:30 amErhlicher Room(NQ 3100), 105 S. State St. Ann Arbor

    On Tuesday (12/5 @ 11:30 AM. North Quad, Ehrlicher Room NQ 3100), Andy Ko from University of Washington will give a talk titled Learning to code: Why we fail, how we flourish.

     

    Please help forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested! Light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP by 12PM on 12/3 if you will be there : https://goo.gl/forms/2zOmfkcvcuE4ZJv73

     

    Speaker Bio:

     

    Andrew J. Ko is an Associate Professor at the University of Washington Information School and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering. He directs the Code & Cognition lab, which studies interactions between people and code, spanning the areas of human-computer interaction, computing education, and software engineering. He is the author of over 90 peer-reviewed publications, 9 receiving best paper awards and 2 receiving most influential paper awards. He received his Ph.D. at the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University in 2008, and degrees in Computer Science and Psychology with Honors from Oregon State University in 2002.

     

    Abstract:

     

    Millions of people are learning to code, but most fail. Why? In this talk I argue that we actually know very little about what programming is or how people learn it. I present my lab's numerous efforts to investigate these problems, including including studies of programming expertise, the failures of classes, bootcamps, books, and coding tutorials at promoting learning, and the challenges of sustaining interest in learning over time. I also present several new tools and techniques for learning to code that can substantially increase learning, productivity, and self-efficacy, including an approach to completely teaching rank novices a programming language in just a few hours. These findings are just a glimpse into the rapidly evolving area of computing education research.

     

    Please join us for this talk on 12/5 @ 11:30 AM